Perfunctory - Deepstash
Perfunctory

Perfunctory

Perfunctory [per·func·to·ry] – something done without much care or attention.

  • Part of Speech: Adjective
  • Sentence Example: The customer made a perfunctory review of the sales agreement before he signed.

STASHED IN:

3

Your Vocabulary Can Make You Sound Smart. Why use a simple 25-cents word when you can use an impressive $20 word? Sometimes, the $20 word is just what you need to turn a plain sentence into an intriguing description that will leave your listeners wanting more of your enriching vocabulary.

STASHED IN:

2 Comments

MORE IDEAS FROM 10 Words to Make You Sound Wicked Smart

Elucidate

Elucidate [elu·ci·date] – to explain or make something clear.

  • Part of Speech: Verb
  • Sentence Example: Could you elucidate that concept so that I can fully grasp it?

1

STASHED IN:

3

Scintillating

Scintillating [scin·til·lat·ing] – something fascinating or brilliantly clever.

  • Part of Speech: Adjective
  • Sentence Example: She created a scintillating presentation for the meeting.

1

STASHED IN:

5

Quintessential

Quintessential [quin·tes·sen·tial] – a typical example of a particular person or characteristic.

  • Part of Speech: Adjective
  • Sentence Example: It was the quintessential chocolate chip cookie, with its slightly chewy texture and giant chocolate pieces.

STASHED IN:

3

Obfuscate

Obfuscate [ob·fus·cate] – to confuse someone, or to obscure the meaning of something.

  • Part of Speech: Verb
  • Sentence Example: The teenagers used text speak and emojis to obfuscate their messages from their parents.

STASHED IN:

3

Quid pro quo

Quid pro quo - giving something in exchange for getting something.

  • Origin: Latin meaning "this for that"
  • Part of Speech: Noun
  • Sentence Example: He gave her food from his garden as a quid pro quo for her cutting his hair.

STASHED IN:

3

Malaise

Malaise [mal·aise] – physical discomfort or a general feeling of being under the weather.

  • Part of Speech: Noun
  • Sentence Example: She suffered from a malaise that kept her from enjoying the party.

STASHED IN:

3

Non sequitur

Non sequitur [non se·qui·tur] – a statement that does not logically follow what has been said before.

  • Part of Speech: Noun
  • Sentence Example: Her comment about dogs was a real non sequitur when we'd been talking about going to the beach.

STASHED IN:

3

Vitriol

Vitriol [vit·ri·ol] – bitter feelings expressed in writing or speaking.

  • Part of Speech: Noun
  • Sentence Example: Their reactions to his comments were pure vitriol.

STASHED IN:

3

Sycophant

Sycophant [syc·o·phant] – a person who tries to gain attention by flattering powerful or influential people.

  • Part of Speech: Noun
  • Sentence Example: She became a real sycophant when she wanted her boss to provide a good referral.

1

STASHED IN:

3

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEA

What celebrated writers can teach us

George Orwell thought a good sentence means trimming as many words as possible, Virginia Woolf found power in verbs, and Baldwin desired 'a sentence as clean as a bone.'

We can learn from celebrated writers that a good sentence is plain, undecorated and visible. It gets its power from the tension between the ease of its phrasing and the surprise of its thought. Each added word reduces alternatives and narrows the reader's expectations. But up to the last word, the writer can throw a curveball.

17

STASHED IN:

232

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

Every word you use while working expresses something about your personal brand, your confidence, state of mind, authority and knowledge. The verbs that we put in sentences are key to our image at work.

Weak words used often can end up projecting us as weak.

30

STASHED IN:

2.85K

STASHED IN:

1 Comment

“Be A Strong Writer”

This is one of the first pieces of advice people give to those seeking remote work.

When you work remotely, a few misplaced words can become an occupational hazard. Every word you type (or don’t) is important in conveying your ideas and communicating effectively with your colleagues.

22

STASHED IN:

338