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How desire can warp our view of the world

What influences our perception

  • What we pay attention to and context
  • Expectations and stereotypes 
  • Motivation. We tend to see what we want to see.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How desire can warp our view of the world

How desire can warp our view of the world

https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2019/8/8/20706126/motivated-perception-psychology

vox.com

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Key Ideas

What influences our perception

  • What we pay attention to and context
  • Expectations and stereotypes 
  • Motivation. We tend to see what we want to see.

Motivated perception

It is the idea that we see what we want to see.

It’s similar to another concept — motivated reasoning, where we come to conclusions we’re predisposed to believe in.

Naive realism

It is the feeling that our perception of the world reflects the truth.

Of all our senses, we tend to trust our eyes the most. And we believe that the way we see the world is the way that the world really is.

Knowing our biases

It gives us the space, the opportunity and the awareness that we could do something about them.

What’s so hard about dealing with our biases is how silently they operate in our minds. We’re not always aware of our motivations and our expectations.

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Strengthen your connection to yourself

  • Psychologist Anne Wilson has manipulated people's perception of time. By using a longer timeline, such as a due date that is far off, people feel more connected to their future selves.
  • Hal Hershfield, an assistant professor, used a virtual reality room to show subjects a digitally older version of themselves. The result is that participants were more likely to make responsible choices for their future selves.

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Memory conformity

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False memories can also happen to groups and could lead to mass delusions. People were shown a fake CCTV footage of a shop robbery and discussed what they’d seen. One of the participants introduced false ideas: the thief had a gun, right? Three in four people later recounted these fabricated ‘facts’ when questioned.

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Brainshift: how our perceptions alter

Under particular circumstances (involving high anxiety or a major reward) our brains cause us to perceive the world around us in ways that contradict and distort objective reality. It's when we'...

Why we stick to bad decisions

Psychologists call this “the anchoring bias.”

After we’ve made a decision, even an illogical one, we tend to cling to it. That is, we filter out dissenting information while seeking data that confirms our original viewpoints.

How to avoid brainshift

  • Be aware that we are all vulnerable to the consequences of brainshift, regardless of our ethics, social status, or IQ.
  • Know the situations that stoke your fears and desires: Those involving money, sex, and fame/recognition are good places to start.
  • Answer to these questions: What’s the worst thing that could happen? How would I feel if that outcome occurred?