Every organization has an emotional culture - Deepstash

Every organization has an emotional culture

... even if it’s one of suppression.

Emotional culture is rarely managed as deliberately as the cognitive culture—and often it’s not managed at all. Companies suffer as a result. 

Research shows that emotional culture influences employee satisfaction, burnout, teamwork, and even hard measures such as financial performance and absenteeism.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Manage Your Emotional Culture

Some companies have begun to explicitly include emotions in their management principles. But to get a comprehensive read on an organization’s emotional culture and then deliberately manage it, you have to make sure that what is codified in mission statements is also enacted in daily organizational life. It's about small gestures rather than bold declarations of feeling.

Facial expressions and body language are equally powerful. If a manager consistently comes to work looking angry (whether he means to or not), he may cultivate a culture of anger.

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Cognitive culture vs emotional culture
  • When people talk about corporate culture, they’re typically referring to cognitive culture: the shared intellectual values, norms, artifacts, and assumptions that serve as a guide for the group to thrive.
  • The other critical part is what we call the group’s emotional culture: the shared affective values, norms, artifacts, and assumptions that govern which emotions people have and express at work and which ones they are better off suppressing.

Cognitive culture is often conveyed verbally, whereas emotional culture tends to be conveyed through nonverbal cues.

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  • Working to inspire and motivate those around;
  • Focus on collaboration between team members, which creates synergy and a better experience for employees;
  • “Walking the talk,” or act with integrity and honesty with every team member;
  • Building trust: consistently acting with integrity and honesty;
  • Developing and supporting others, and celebrating their successes;
  • Building relationships, which communicates that each team member is valued.

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Take a moment to consider if your employees and team members are coming to you with new ideas and innovations.

To create a sense of security where employees will feel safe to share their ideas, tailor your training strategy to employees ' individual strengths. The employees will feel safe in the training environment and be more willing to take risks when sharing their ideas. From the training room, it can spread organically into day-to-day operations and the workplace culture.

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A Fresh Imperative To Act

Every organization faces a unique set of challenges and contexts. There are strategic moments in an organization’s journey that have a disproportionate impact on outcomes.

Getting them right creates a multiplier effect on other activities as people learn new ways of working and increase their advocacy for the program of work.

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Business leaders often are tempted to focus on strategy over culture. But the strongest companies take four key actions that deliver the best of both.

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