The 'revolving door' approach

... is a technique that relies on using an outside perspective. 

If you're stuck in a big decision, you have to pretend you're a new CEO or a turnaround manager who can "see things more clearly." Adopting a third-person perspective helps you tap into an objective mode of judgment--one based on facts and an understanding of the consequences.

150 STASHED

1 LIKE

How to Remove the Emotion From Decision-Making

inc.com

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Don't decide alone

Never make an onerous decision by yourself. Tap into the wisdom of the company's internal crowd.

132 STASHED

1 LIKE

Decision-making rules

Write a clear, objective set of rules to guide future decisions.

It will enable you to make a decision that is detached from the emotion of the moment.

147 STASHED

1 LIKE

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

  1. Free discussion: all viewpoints and different aspects of an issue are openly debated and where everyone has a chance to speak or express their opinions.
  2. Reaching a clear decision. The terms of the decision should be framed with utter clarity.
  3. Everyone involved must give the decision reached by the group full support. This does not necessarily mean agreement: so long as the participants commit to back the decision, that is a satisfactory outcome. 

178 STASHED

Don't Let Your Emotions Make Your Decisions. Try The Revolving Door Test For Decision-Making.

medium.com

The ABCDs of categorizing decisions
  • Big-bet decisions: infrequent and high-risk - from major acquisitions to game-changing capital investments;
  • Cross-cutting decisions: frequent and high-risk - think pricing, sales, and operations planning processes or new-product launches;
  • Delegated decisions: frequent and low-risk - routine elements of day-to-day management, typically in areas such as hiring, marketing, and purchasing;
  • Ad hoc decisions: infrequent, low-stakes.

389 STASHED

6 LIKES

Untangling your organization's decision making

mckinsey.com

David Collis - Harvard Business School professor

“Most executives cannot articulate the objective, scope, and advantage of their business in a simple statement. If they can’t, neither can anyone else.”

199 STASHED

12 LIKES

Make Strategic Thinking Part of Your Job

hbr.org