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Schedule recurring social activities

Having an active social life is crucial to your health. People who isolate themselves from others could increase their risk of death by about 50 percent. 

If you have a busy life, schedule recurring social activities with your closest friends, monthly.  Plan your work schedule around your social calendar instead of the other way around.

@noahb

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Many of us are working longer hours than we should be just because we are wasting time on low-value activities.

Track your time for a few days to identify your distractors and the low-values tasks that should be delegated.

The key to finding the balance between work and health is learning how to cope with stress.

Get in the habit of stepping away from the stressful situation for a few moments to calm down and collect your thoughts: step away from the computer or spend a few minutes walking outside.

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RELATED IDEAS

Being overwhelmed may be the new normal, but taking on too many responsibilities may be watering down our overall impact.

Bring back your focus to what matters most. Work on the projects that are the real game-changers. Delegate the discretionary work and eliminate unnecessary meetings.

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IDEAS

... instead of task management.

Task management is more effective than time management because these tasks come with clear limits which make them easier to manage. You know when you’ve started work on a project -- and you know when you’ve completed the job. It’s one limited thing at a time.

Make conscientious choices

... about how you spend your time.  Others will come to value your time only if you value it first.

For example, be aware of the calendar invitations that you accept. If it’s from your boss or client, you probably have to go. But if it’s a group meeting that you could easily catch up on from one of your colleagues, decline.