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The Weekly Review: A Productivity Ritual to Get More Done

Develop a set of questions

...  to ask yourself during your weekly review:

  • How do I feel I did this week overall?
  • What enabled me to reach my goals this week?
  • Has anything stopped me from reaching my goals this week?
  • How can I improve for next week?
  • What can I do next week that will set me up for my long-term goals?

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The Weekly Review: A Productivity Ritual to Get More Done

The Weekly Review: A Productivity Ritual to Get More Done

https://doist.com/blog/weekly-review/

doist.com

7

Key Ideas

The weekly review

It’s dedicated time to think about the past week, reflect on what went well and what didn’t, and plan for the week ahead. 

It’s a chance to get aligned with your goals and ensure that the work you’re doing on a daily basis is helping you reach them

The 3 parts of a weekly review

  • Get Clear: process all your loose-ends.
  • Get Current: make sure all your items are up to date.
  • Get Creative: come up with new ideas to improve how you live and work.

Benefits of weekly reviews

  • You gain an objective view of the week: a weekly review forces you to practice intention by taking time to pause and reflect as you consider what you did versus what you planned to do.
  • You become proactive in planning: a weekly review isn’t only a retrospective, but a prospective too. It lets you run through the upcoming Monday to Friday proactively.

Completing your weekly review

  • Choose your weekly review day, time, and place: Consistency will keep you on track when motivation won’t. Keep your weekly review at the same time on the same day every week.
  • Create your weekly review checklist: Have a checklist handy that details exactly what you’ll go through during your weekly review.

Going through your weekly review

  • Be objective: Try your best to take an unbiased look at your week and lean on objective measures of your performance for the week.
  • Be efficient: Move from one checklist item to the next without lingering too long in any one area.
  • Be kind: Instead of beating yourself up about a bad week, gently reflect on what went wrong and plan for a more productive week ahead.

Develop a set of questions

...  to ask yourself during your weekly review:

  • How do I feel I did this week overall?
  • What enabled me to reach my goals this week?
  • Has anything stopped me from reaching my goals this week?
  • How can I improve for next week?
  • What can I do next week that will set me up for my long-term goals?

David Allen

David Allen

“… the Weekly Review is the critical success factor for marrying your larger commitments to your day-to-day activities.”

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