Look at the nonverbal cues - Deepstash

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How To Spot A Lie In 5 Seconds (And The Biggest Lie I Ever Told In PR)

Look at the nonverbal cues

The person will enter a phase of fight or flight. The strain of deception will typically cause the skin to flush or to turn cold and itch. The person will scratch their ears or nose. They will answer too quickly.  They might fidget or suddenly tap nervously.

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Clarify the question

Make sure you're not assuming what you're being asked and take the  time to really understand the question.

Insert parts of the question in your answers, but never repeat the negative la...

Take thinking time

When you're faced with difficult questions, make sure you buy yourself enough time to determine how you want to respond.

Repeating of rephrasing the question could give you some extra time for thinking about how you want to answer.

Answer part of the question

Find a part of the question you are comfortable answering if answering the whole question is not an option.

This may sometimes be enough to satisfy the other person.

Our Image In A Professional Setting
Our Image In A Professional Setting

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Our Digital Image

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Working With The Algorithm

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Task switching and focus

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A schedule for sustained attention
It includes:
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  • “Themed” days to reduce the need to recalibrate between different tasks.
  • Advanced planning so you can prioritize meaningful work.
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