Doing your weekend wrong - Deepstash

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You're doing your weekend wrong

Doing your weekend wrong

Just because you didn’t work last weekend doesn’t mean you had a good weekend.

If you don’t feel rejuvenated and keen to face Monday after two work-free days, you're doing your weekend wrong.

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An Unbalanced Life

We live in a culture where work demands our complete allegiance. At the same time, it can be extremely enriching. You feel challenged by your work, you're attached to it, you're learning new things...

Redefine Success

Reconsider how you define success. Workaholics are always aiming to get ahead. But you also need to draw a boundary line that shows respect for your family life, and your physical and spiritual well-being.

Refocus Your Attention

After you have redefined success, consider how you want to invest your time and energy. 

There will always be more work to be done, but make a choice to spend your time elsewhere: with family, friends, or in your community. And when you spend time with your family or friends, do so with undivided attention.

The time blocking method
The time blocking method

When thinking about our workday, we should give every minute a job. This technique is called time blocking.

Most people generally approach their workday with a list of task...

Problems with the list/reactive time management methods
  • With the reactive method, you let other people's needs drive your activities. You feel busy and exhausted, but not really getting important tasks done.
  • Because you have no plan besides trying to get things done, your brain keeps looking for "breaks," which have a way of decreasing the total amount of work you're able to accomplish.
The time blocking method gives you control
  • With the time blocking method, you control the balance between the urgent and the important.
  • Because you know what you're supposed to be doing, you're less likely to take unplanned breaks.
  • You know exactly how much time you really have available, and how long tasks will take.
Recharging after work
Recharging after work

What we do in our downtime matters. For example, sports-related hobbies are beneficial for recharging because they require active engagement and distract the mind from work-rel...

Balance out your working life

One approach for recharging leads to balance and recovery. It suggests you use your downtime for something unrelated to your job that will refresh you. Think about it in terms of detachment, relaxation, autonomy, mastery, meaning, and affiliation.

You first have to understand which of your needs are least satisfied by your work, then choose hobbies which fulfill these needs. If your work does not offer enough social interaction, pick a social pastime. If your job is not challenging, choose a hobby where you can learn new skills.

Enrichment Theory

Enrichment Theory offers a perspective from work psychology and points out that the skills and experiences we build in our free time can complement our work performance.

It suggests that you find a hobby that touches on your job in some way. If you want to use your leadership skills, play the role of team captain for your local soccer team.