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What's Microproductivity? The Small Habit That Will Lead You To Big Wins

We Hate Waiting For Results

We want to see progress quickly. We enjoy the feeling of crossing something off our to-do list - dopamine is being released. 

By breaking long-term assignments down, you open the door to experience more frequent rewards and dopamine rushes which inspire you to keep taking steps forward.

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What's Microproductivity? The Small Habit That Will Lead You To Big Wins

What's Microproductivity? The Small Habit That Will Lead You To Big Wins

https://blog.trello.com/microproductivity-break-tasks-into-smaller-steps

blog.trello.com

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Key Ideas

Melissa Gratias

Melissa Gratias

"Breaking tasks down helps us to see large tasks as more approachable and doable, and reduces our propensity to procrastinate or defer tasks, because we simply don’t know where to begin."

Your Brain Is Limited

So by breaking a larger project down into smaller to-dos, it will be easier for you to identify what step you should take next.

These smaller steps should be written down on a list. 

You Work Better With Specific Goals

The main reasons why specific goals are so powerful:

  • They force us to make a choice to pursue them and exclude anything that’s irrelevant. This increases our focus.
  • They incite effort.
  • They inspire us to be more persistent, as we have a clear idea of what success looks like.
  • They immediately get our wheels turning on the strategies necessary to attain them.

Regular Feedback Keeps You On Track

By breaking down large projects into smaller steps you have the opportunity to receive feedback faster and make adjustments when necessary.

We Hate Waiting For Results

We want to see progress quickly. We enjoy the feeling of crossing something off our to-do list - dopamine is being released. 

By breaking long-term assignments down, you open the door to experience more frequent rewards and dopamine rushes which inspire you to keep taking steps forward.

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'Eat that Frog'

This is a productivity method developed by Brian Tracy. The 'frog' refers to the most important and most impactful task you have to complete.

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Clarify your goals

If you don't know what your goals are, most likely you won't be able to identify and prioritize the specific tasks you need to work on to achieve those goals. 

Write your major goals down and break them into tasks. Your goal tasks are your frogs, the things you want to work on first thing every day for greater productivity and success.

Think long-term

... to make better short-term decisions.

If you question the consequences of doing/not doing a to-do before you start on it, it not only makes it easier to find your frogs, but it also makes it easier to find time-wasting tasks that are better deleted from your list or delegated to someone else.

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Completion bias

It's where your brain specifically seeks the hit of dopamine you get from crossing off small tasks and ignores working on larger, more complex ones.

Small wins and motivation

Out of all the things that can boost our mood and motivation, the single most important is making progress on meaningful work.

Just like we love crossing small tasks off our to-do list, being able to see that we’re even one step closer to a big goal is a huge motivator. The problem is that these “small wins” are hard to measure.

“Most of us make advances small and large every single day, but we fail to notice them because we lack a method for acknowledging our progress. This is a huge loss.”

“Most of us make advances small and large every single day, but we fail to notice them because we lack a method for acknowledging our progress. This is a huge loss.”

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Excuse-making

It's a defense mechanism you use in the battle between your positive self-identity and the common challenges of everyday life.

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The self-serving bias

It encourages you to claim your successes and to deflect your failures.

When something good happens, you take the credit, but when something bad happens, you blame it on something out of your control.

Common types of excuses
  • Lies: This is one of the worst types of excuses—a straight-up lie.
  • Self-handicapping excuses: Such as “I don’t have the skills to do that”, or “That’s not my job.”
  • Blame-shifting excuses: Instead of putting the blame on your lack of abilities, you accuse external factors for your missteps or lack of performance.

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