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This 100-Year-Old To-Do List Hack Still Works Like A Charm

Why Lee’s Productivity Method Works

  • It’s simple: complexity is often a weakness as it makes it harder to get back on track when unforeseen events happen.
  • It narrows the goals: If you have too many ideas or tasks trimming away what isn’t essential is key. Otherwise, you’ll commit to nothing and be distracted by everything.
  • It gives a starting point: Starting is the biggest hurdle to finishing most tasks. Lee’s method forces you to decide on your first task the night before you go to work.
  • It prevents multitasking: There’s scientific evidence that having fewer priorities leads to better work. Mastery requires focus and consistency. 

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This 100-Year-Old To-Do List Hack Still Works Like A Charm

This 100-Year-Old To-Do List Hack Still Works Like A Charm

https://www.fastcompany.com/3062946/this-100-year-old-to-do-list-hack-still-works-like-a-charm

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Why Lee’s Productivity Method Works

  • It’s simple: complexity is often a weakness as it makes it harder to get back on track when unforeseen events happen.
  • It narrows the goals: If you have too many ideas or tasks trimming away what isn’t essential is key. Otherwise, you’ll commit to nothing and be distracted by everything.
  • It gives a starting point: Starting is the biggest hurdle to finishing most tasks. Lee’s method forces you to decide on your first task the night before you go to work.
  • It prevents multitasking: There’s scientific evidence that having fewer priorities leads to better work. Mastery requires focus and consistency. 

The Ivy Lee Productivity Method

  1. At the end of the day, write in order of importance only the six most important things you need to accomplish tomorrow.
  2. In the next day, concentrate only on the first task until it is finished before moving on to the second task and so on.
  3. At the end of the day, move unfinished items to a new list of six tasks for the following day.
  4. Repeat this process every day.

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