What fear of success looks like - Deepstash

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Fear of Success: How It Works and What to Do About It | Nick Wignall

What fear of success looks like

  • Fear of success usually doesn’t mean a literal fear of success. People fear the results and consequences of making lots of money, for example, not the money itself.
  • Fear of success is often learned at a young age.
  • Fear of success is maintained (and made worse) by avoidance.
  • Fear of success is painful. It brings a lot of anxiety.
  • Most people who are afraid of success are embarrassed by their fear.

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Fear of Success: How It Works and What to Do About It | Nick Wignall

Fear of Success: How It Works and What to Do About It | Nick Wignall

https://nickwignall.com/fear-of-success/

nickwignall.com

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Key Ideas

Fear of success

It's a very real but often misunderstood struggle. The key thing to realize is that, in most cases, the fear is about the consequences of success, not the success itself. 

This fear likely has very strong and very old origins in a person’s past.

Work through your fear of success

  • Validate your fear of success by understanding its origins.
  • Track your avoidance strategies related to fear of success.
  • Face your fears of success (the smart way).
  • Get professional help from a cognitive behavioral therapist.

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