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Reach Peak Productivity With These 5 Strategies

Recognize Your Decision Points

If we act on autopilot, unaware of the time and our surroundings, we are likely to gravitate to tasks that are easy or urgent.

Identify decision moments, and pause and reflect on your true priorities.

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Reach Peak Productivity With These 5 Strategies

Reach Peak Productivity With These 5 Strategies

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/reach-peak-productivity-w_b_7829168

huffpost.com

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Key Ideas

Be Intentional

The right metric for human performance is effectiveness, not efficiency.

Intentionally decide on the task at hand; intentionally perfect the conditions for working on that task; intentionally treat your body the way it needs to be treated.

Recognize Your Decision Points

If we act on autopilot, unaware of the time and our surroundings, we are likely to gravitate to tasks that are easy or urgent.

Identify decision moments, and pause and reflect on your true priorities.

Manage Your Mental Energy

For peak productivity, we must tackle our work when we have the mental energy for it. 

Identify your two best mental hours, and intentionally schedule your important work during that time.

Stop Fighting Distractions

Our attention systems are designed to regularly discover what is new in our environment. 

To help you refocus, allow your mind to wander or take a few minutes to stare out the window. 

Leverage Your Mind-Body Connection

Focus as much on your physical health as your mental health.

Stay hydrated, eat smaller meals more often, moderate your caffeine intake, exercise.

Make Your Workspace Work For You

Create a physical environment that is restorative rather than distracting.

Choose a quiet area, with bright and cool lighting and keep your desk uncluttered.

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Taking a break once an hour

... increases productivity. 

A break can serve as creative fuel

Something as simple as a ten-minute conversation with a friend, or watching an inspiring video can give us a much needed boost, or point us in a new direction if we've been stuck. 

Talking a step away -- literally or figuratively -- might be just what we need to recharge.

Physical movement

We are not designed to sit around all day. 

Getting up for a few minutes and getting our blood flowing and some more oxygen to the brain is a necessary piece of the work day.

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Asking If This Is Necessary

When you feel overwhelmed, ask yourself if what you have to do is necessary. Depending on the answer reschedule, drop it or continue.

Keep in mind what’s the most important thing to ge...

Time For Unconscious Thought

When you get away from work, you clear mental clutter and initiate unconscious thought. Delaying decisions until you’ve had time to simmer brings better results and lessens your sense of being overworked.

Visualizing The Future

For those overwhelmed with worry about the future, create a routine of visualization. After taking a few deep breaths to clear your mind, envision the answer to the following questions:

  • What am I trying to do?
  • How do I need to show up to do that?

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Productivity Obsession
Productivity Obsession

As workers, we are obsessed with getting stuff done. It is then clear why there seems to be a bottomless well full of advice, hacks, tools, tricks, and secrets to help us pack more into the waking ...

Modern History of Productivity
  • Adam Smith wrote in 1776 that there are two kinds of labor: productive and unproductive. The productive one generally adds value to the materials which he works upon, of his own maintenance, and his master's profit. However, a man grows poor by maintaining a multitude of menial servants who add to the value of nothing.
  • Benjamin Franklin put forth his own "to-do" list in 1791, stating that one should start the day asking what good shall be done and end the day evaluating what was accomplished.
Abuse Masked as Productivity

In the late 18th and early 19th century, during the Industrial Revolution, machines moved production from handmade in the home to factories. A frenzy of producing more goods more quickly became a kind of national pastime.

Low-wage factory workers, many of whom were children, toiled in unsafe conditions for decades before labor unions put measures in place to protect workers from the excesses of the push for productivity.

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