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Seven Ways to Slow Down - Mindful

Cultivate a healthy environment

You can always create an environment that fosters a sense of peace and contentment in your daily life.

For example, try tidying your room, repainting it or adding plans to your desk at work.

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Seven Ways to Slow Down - Mindful

Seven Ways to Slow Down - Mindful

https://www.mindful.org/seven-ways-to-slow-down/

mindful.org

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Key Ideas

Alain de Botton

Alain de Botton

“What registers as anxiety is typically no freakish phenomenon; it is the mind’s logical enraged plea not to be continuously and exhaustingly overstimulated.”

Relationships: quality, not quantity

The many relationships we foster are valuable and enrich our lives. But the pressure we put on ourselves to maintain these relationships can, at times, be damaging. 

When you feel overextended, it’s important to learn to just say no to a dinner out or a weekend work trip.

Get good sleep

When you're feeling unfocused, before trying to make big changes in your life, to fix things, press the reset button and put yourself to bed.

And if you have trouble getting to sleep, try a sleep meditation.

A break from the information cycle

In the past news came to us slowly (through letters, gossip from the neighbors or the printed newspaper). 

But today, with the entire internet in the palm of our hands, we are tuned into everything at once. And it’s messing with our mental health. 

Practice mindful eating

Pay attention to your meals and begin to savor each bite, in order to feel more full and satisfied for longer.

Because if you work or check your phone while eating, you miss out on all the mood-boosting benefits that come with it.

Check in with your emotions

When you don't take the time to pause and notice how you really feel and even worse, you bury your emotions, you put yourself at greater risk of burnout.

Practice mindful journaling to check in with your thoughts as often as possible.

Focus on personal achievement

... rather than status.

It's more fulfilling to focus your time and energy on something you really care about, even if that’s a more quiet type of success (for example, learning how to play guitar).

Cultivate a healthy environment

You can always create an environment that fosters a sense of peace and contentment in your daily life.

For example, try tidying your room, repainting it or adding plans to your desk at work.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Why We Worry

The motivation for your worry often comes from past events.

Alain De Botton explains that this is due to traumatic events from our childhood that were never properly processed.

How to move on from worry
Once you recognize the source of your anxieties, you can replace worry with reflection.

“Appreciating the childhood legacy of worries, we also stand to realize that we can adapt and improve on how we respond to what alarms us.”  -- Philosopher Alain de Botton.

Anxiety is rewarding

Each time we worry and nothing bad happens, our mind connects worry with preventing harm:

Worry → nothing bad happens.

And the takeaway is, "It's a good thing I worried."&nbs...

Beliefs about worry
  • If I worry, I'll never have a bad surprise.
  • It's safer if I worry. We believe that the act of worrying itself somehow lowers the likelihood of a dreaded outcome. 
  • I show I care by worrying. We need to distinguish between caring about a situation and worrying needlessly and fruitlessly about it. 
  • Worrying motivates me. We need to differentiate between unproductive worry and productive concern and problem solving.
  • Worrying helps me solve problems. Extreme worry is more likely to interfere with problem-solving. 
Tools to assist us with worry
  • Calm the nervous system with guided muscle relaxation, meditation, and exercise. 
  • Notice when you're worrying and any beliefs that reinforce worry.  Awareness of the process gives us more choice in how we respond.
  • Embrace uncertainty. Most of the things we care about in life involve uncertainty. It takes considerable practice to begin to embrace it.
  • Live in the present. Practice focusing your attention on the present in everyday activities like taking a shower, walking, or talking with a friend, as well as in more formal practices like meditation or yoga.
  • When we face our fears head-on, they tend to diminish. Deliberately accept what you're afraid of: "It's possible I'll miss my flight." 
Mindful Wakeup
Mindful Wakeup

First thing in the morning:

  • Close your eyes and connect with the sensations of your seated body.
  • Take three long, deep, nourishing breaths—breathing in through your nose and out ...
Mindful Eating
  • Breathe before eating. 
  • Listen to your body and measure your hunger.
  • Eat according to your hunger. You can more mindfully choose what to eat, when to eat, and how much to eat. 
  • Practice peaceful eating. It’s not easy to digest or savor your food if you aren’t relaxed.
  • If you don’t love it, don’t eat it. Make a mindful choice about what to eat based on what you really enjoy.
Mindful Pause
  • Trip over what you want to do. If you intend to do some yoga or to meditate, put your yoga mat or your meditation cushion in the middle of your floor.
  • Refresh your triggers regularly - add variety or make them funny so they stick with you longer.
  • Create new patterns. You could try a series of “If this, then that” messages to create easy reminders to shift into slow brain.

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