Creating Space for Focused Work

Very often we’ll push off the bigger, more meaningful tasks because they take longer, and we’re either in distracted mode or quick-task mode.

Set aside the next 20 minutes for writing, or getting moving on a big project. You don’t have to do the whole project in this time, but just the act of giving yourself more space to focus is a huge shift.

@franciscoaw46

Time Management

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It comes down to three habits:

  • Asking yourself what meaningful, impactful work you can get done today.
  • Creating space for meaningful work instead of just doing busywork or being distracted all day.
  • Working in fullscreen mode and diving in.

It’s an incredible habit to take even a few moments at the beginning of your day (or the end of the day before) to give some thought to where you’d like to concentrate your attention. 

Ask yourself: What is worth doing today? What is worth focusing on? What is worth spending the limited time you have in this life?

This habit is about letting this one meaningful task become your whole universe.

This translates into writing in a fullscreen writing app. Or opening a browser tab in a separate window (with no other tabs showing) and putting that window in fullscreen mode. It can also mean doing one thing at a time in offline life as well.

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Mental States

It’s really important to monitor mental states. They will usually affect whether we do our exercise, eat healthy, binge watch TV shows, drink alcohol, eat junk food, or are open-hearted (or rude) with the people we love.

It’s also an incredible skill to be able to move into the proper mental state to do focused work, to create, to meditate, to exercise, or do whatever you find meaningful.

5

IDEAS

  1. Use a time-tracking app and review the kind of activities that are done during the day and how much time the activities take.
  2. Categorize those activities as ‘maker’ or ‘manager’.
  3. Find the daily patterns and use that information to schedule your ‘maker time’.
  4. Keep an eye on the stuff that interrupts you the most and try to eliminate or minimize the same.
  5. Take a review at the end of each week to make some tweaks in your schedule.
Getting an early start

Plan your morning the night before and stick to your plan. 
If a new task comes in that isn’t 100% urgent, designate a time that you’ll work on it uninterrupted or try to delegate the problem solving as much as possible until you have time to deal with it.

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