Matching the experience we feel inside - Deepstash
Matching the experience we feel inside

Matching the experience we feel inside

Halloween is an opportunity to align ourselves from the inside out with our own psychological feeling.

It makes us feel completely alive in a split second -- like a wake-up call.

STASHED IN:

66

MORE IDEAS FROM The Psychology of Halloween: 3 Reasons We Crave the Scare

We love to expect the unexpected

We crave the adrenalin and excitement that goes along with being scared and in scaring.

Horror movies and hide-and-seek have a similar sensorial experience.

STASHED IN:

60

Power
The very idea of "tricking" has the implicit idea of getting one over on another and therefore being triumphant.

Our hearts race, we sweat, and blood rushes to our faces in anticipation. The same happens to the person on the other side of the trick.

1

STASHED IN:

54

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEA

The 'dark factor'

A love of horror movies is associated with an underlying dimension of entertainment preferences, dubbed "the dark factor".

Those with dark tastes value intensity, edginess and rebellion. Their personalities lean towards risk-taking, antagonism, imagination, and tough-mindedness.

STASHED IN:

127

Feeling rewarded

According to a 2008 study, dopamine is responsible for feelings of accomplishment and rewards, but it's also been linked to averse emotions like fear and dread.

People who enjoy fearful or risky situations tend to get more out of being scared out of their wits because they end up with higher levels of dopamine. Adrenaline, which is also released during dangerous moments, is also perceived as enjoyable by some.

STASHED IN:

88

What makes fireworks so appealing

The reason we like fireworks so much: they scare us.

  • Like lightning, the bright flashes warn us something is about to happen. This activates the amygdala, a little ball of nerves in the brain that detects fear.
  • After the lights have stimulated the anticipation of a threat, the resounding crack of the firework confirms this perception in our brains. In response, our reward centers release a surge of dopamine (the feel-good neurotransmitter).

1

STASHED IN:

86