The KonMari process - Deepstash

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Every Thing You Own is a Relationship You're In

The KonMari process

Summed up, it goes like this: you go through every possession you own, hold it in your hands, and keep it only if it evokes some kind of “joy”.

The theory is that any possession that gives you bad or mixed feelings is too costly to have in your life, if it’s possible to get rid of it.

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Every Thing You Own is a Relationship You're In

Every Thing You Own is a Relationship You're In

https://www.raptitude.com/2015/08/konmari/

raptitude.com

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Key Ideas

Every possession is a relationship

So it makes sense to carefully consider what we keep in our homes.

Most of us own lots of things that make us feel bad (unused gifts, clothes we don't like or that don't fit, books we’ll never read, etc). And if it’s normal to have hundreds or thousands of possessions, then we are each, at all times, bearing the weight of hundreds or thousands of these relationships. 

Decisions about your identity

Getting rid of stuff can be quite liberating. Much of this process is about deciding who you are and who you’re not going to be. 

You can’t move forward when you’re trying to keep a foot in every door.

What you 'need' to keep

You will eventually find a lot of things that you need to keep, despite the fact they bring no joy. To help address this, keep a running list of things you want to replace with a more pleasing version.

The psychology of owning stuff

Our possessions are more psychological than physical. What a thing is is much less important than what it does to your mind when you own it.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

“The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.”
Hans Hofmann
Remove decorations

... that no longer inspire you. Just because something made you happy in the past doesn’t mean you have to keep it forever.

Your life has moved on—maybe it’s time for the decoration to do the same. Keeping just the items that mean the most to you will help them to shine.

Reject the convenience fallacy

There are certain places in our homes we tend to leave items out for convenience. By leaving these things out, we think we’re saving time and simplifying our lives. That’s the convenience fallacy. 

W might save a couple of seconds, but the other 99.9 percent of the time, those items just sit there creating a visual distraction. 

11 more ideas

Epictetus

“Wealth consists not in having great possessions, but in having few wants.”

Epictetus
Rules for de-cluttering life
  • Don't buy the stuff you can't afford.
  • Live below your means
  • Get rid of things when they take up the space you need. Donate or recycle them.
Why be a minimalist

Minimalism is a way of eschewing the non-essential in order to focus on what’s truly important, what gives our lives meaning, what gives us joy and value.

It’s a way to esc...

Minimalist living

It’s about getting rid of things you do not use or need, leaving an uncluttered, simple environment and an uncluttered, simple life.

It’s living without an obsession with material things or an obsession with doing everything and doing too much. It’s using simple tools, having a simple wardrobe, carrying little and living lightly.

The benefits of minimalism
  • It’s more sustainable.
  • It’s easier to organize.
  • It’s lower in stress.
  • It’s less expensive and less debt.
  • It’s less cleaning and maintaining.
  • There’s more room for creating, for loved ones, for peace, for doing the things that give you joy.
  • There’s more time for getting healthy.