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4 Reasons Smart Leaders Know When to Stop Playing It Safe

Ask yourself what makes you happy

An opportunity should not only be viewed by the benefits it provides. 

Knowing how the opportunity will make you happy should also have an influence on your decisions.

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4 Reasons Smart Leaders Know When to Stop Playing It Safe

4 Reasons Smart Leaders Know When to Stop Playing It Safe

https://www.inc.com/minda-zetlin/4-reasons-smart-leaders-know-when-to-stop-playing-it-safe.html

inc.com

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Key Ideas

Ask yourself what makes you happy

An opportunity should not only be viewed by the benefits it provides. 

Knowing how the opportunity will make you happy should also have an influence on your decisions.

Be willing to gamble on yourself

Moving on in life is possible if you have a good understanding and knowledge of yourself.

Believe in yourself that you are able to figure out a way forward. 

Double down

Finding a good opportunity may leave you to put everything in to make it work, and the confidence to move beyond your safety nets. 

The safe thing may not be the right thing

Life challenges us. We have the ability to meet those challenges if we believe we can.

Consider how you got past other challenges to give you confidence to handle the next one.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Align your decisions with your vision
Find the right people to bring on board and the best strategies or tools to use. Be very clear about why you are creating your product.
Develop a presales waiting list 

.... with your early supporters. Get people excited in advance. There is a risk if the production run goes south, but this is a good way to pay for early production costs.

You can’t take “no” for an answer

Just because somebody tells you no, that’s their limitation.

Just keep pressing forward until you feel you’ve come to the end of the path, but do not let the end of your path be because someone else does not believe in your idea. 

one more idea

Rich Dad, Poor Dad
Rich Dad, Poor Dad

"Rich Dad, Poor Dad" is a best-selling personal finance book, written by Robert T. Kiyosaki and Sharon L. Lechter.

It reads like an allegorical story about Robert Kiyosaki a...

“Poor dad” vs "Rich Dad" Mentality

The “Poor dad”, a stereotype for the regular salary man, believes that one should work for money as an employee at a stable job. This mentality can trap a person into working a job they don’t love, but is willing to stick with because they have to pay the bills.

The "Rich dad", an entrepreneur, thinks wealth comes from experience-based learning (learn on the job, by becoming an entrepreneur) and multiple income streams.

When the “poor dad” encourages working your way up the ladder, “rich dad” laughs and says, “Why not own the ladder?”

Key lessons for becoming a "Rich Dad"

According to Kiyosaki in his book "Poor Dad, Rich Dad", rich people do certain things poor people don't:

  1. The rich buy assets (things that generate revenue like bonds), not liabilities (things that cost money like rent).
  2. The rich become financial literate through experience, not by studying hard at fancy schools.
  3. The rich learn to sell early on.
  4. The rich manage fear better. They take more risks and don't play it safe.
Assertiveness
Assertiveness

Assertiveness is behaving in one's own best interests, standing up for oneself without being anxious or guilty, expressing one's honest feelings comfortably, and exercising one's right without deny...

Three Types of Behaviour
  1. Passive behavior: it isn't honest but geared towards being nice to others.
  2. Assertive behavior: it is direct and honest, respecting others but focusing on the self.
  3. Aggressive behavior: it is harmful, egoistic and is about controlling others.
The Middle Path

Most people are either passive or aggressive. Passive people are afraid of confrontation and lie easily.
Aggressive people are not liked, as they can trample others for their own benefit.

The middle ground, assertiveness, is where you want to be: Respectful, firm, observant, and detached.