Get Rid Of Social Loafing

Reducing social loafing tendency and increasing contributions among your team comes down to trust. So find people you trust and then give them the ability to make decisions.

And sometimes it's important to give people the option to not take action if that’s what they think is the right course.

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It describes the fact that we tend to make fewer contributions when we are in a group versus when we work alone (or are solely charged with the responsibility). 

When a number of people could take it upon themselves to repair something, social loafing says a high percentage of them will assume that someone else will take the initiative to complete the task.

  • Social loafing is influenced by the quality of the relationships between co-workers: where there is group cohesiveness, social loafing isn't really that strong.
  • Social loafing is also influences by the size of the group: bigger groups dictate less individual effort. So if you're in a big company, you tend to believe that surely there must be someone else that will solve a specific problem.

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Main sources of internal distraction
  • Remote work or a lack of social interaction.
  • Multitasking.
  • Unpredictable work environments.

Emotional distractions are a symptom of our workplace culture

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Software/Tools

In a remote team, you'll need the right tools to make sure everyone stays on the same page and can continue to execute without a physical person standing next to them.

You likely will need a tool in certain categories like group chat and video conferencing to make remote successful.

  1. Focus on the outcome. Decide what your goal is. Be able to describe it, in detail. 
  2. Look at problems systematically. Consider the problem from all angles, including process, expectations, and resources. Talk to credible and reliable sources. Often, the people closest to the problem have additional insight that makes it easier to choose the best solution.
  3. Get to the heart of it. Make a list of the vital information you need. Once you have the information, prioritize it based on how it relates to your desired outcome.

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