Failure Is Natural, Regret Is Foolish - Deepstash

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The Philosophy Of Stoicism: Five Lessons from Seneca, Musonius Rufus, Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus and Zeno of Citium.

Failure Is Natural, Regret Is Foolish

We should learn from the past, but to regret it and then look at it with disdain brings nothing but frustration and anger. There is no reward for dwelling on what you cannot control, the past.

To build character, expect and embrace failure, then seek obstacles that seem uncomfortable. Practicing negative visualization (envisioning the worst possible scenario so you can better appreciate the present) also helps.

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