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How to Form the Decisiveness Habit : zen habits

Creating a new set of habits

... that that will lead to greater decisiveness:

  • Recognize that you’re feeling uncertainty.
  • Deal with the uncertainty with curiosity.
  • Get the info & evaluate as best you can.
  • Just dive in.
  • Don’t look back — deal with what comes up.
  • See that you’re OK and let go of worry.

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How to Form the Decisiveness Habit : zen habits

How to Form the Decisiveness Habit : zen habits

https://zenhabits.net/decisive/

zenhabits.net

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Key Ideas

The costs of indecisiveness

  • Not taking action can cost you an opportunity, or cost money and time as you delay.
  • People waiting for you to make a decision can get frustrated.
  • You can feel stress about your indecisiveness, and stress about how you’re making people wait.

How we deal with uncertainty

These are some of the common ways we habitually deal with the uncertainty of a decision. But none of them solve the problem for us:

  • Doing some research. 
  • Writing out a pros and cons list.
  • Asking a bunch of people about their opinion.
  • Putting off the decision.

We are uncertain about

  • What the best choice might be.
  • Whether there will be negative consequences of the choice.
  • Whether we’ll look dumb to others if we make the wrong choice.
  • Whether we’ll feel dumb, or ripped off, and regret it for years to come.
  • Whether we’ll be OK if we make the wrong choice.

Creating a new set of habits

... that that will lead to greater decisiveness:

  • Recognize that you’re feeling uncertainty.
  • Deal with the uncertainty with curiosity.
  • Get the info & evaluate as best you can.
  • Just dive in.
  • Don’t look back — deal with what comes up.
  • See that you’re OK and let go of worry.

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Zero-Tasking

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Life doesn’t happen to us; we are an active participant. We get out of life what we choose.”
Mike Whitaker
All Decisions Are Not Created Equal

  • Small decisions: Impact you for a day, such as what you wear and what you eat.
  • Medium decisions: Impact your life for a year or so, such as deciding to go back to school or take on a roommate.
  • Big decisions: These are made once or twice a year, and successful people use their goals to navigate to the right choice.

Decision making using goals

Successful people have 4 strategies that help them clearly define what they want:

  • They keep 5 prime goals and stay focused on them.
  • They identify the top priority and give it favorable treatment when making decisions.
  • They look for goal and decision overlap, treating this decision with more care.
  • They appreciate momentum, identifying the benefits of continuing to move in the right direction.

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Paradox of Choice
Paradox of Choice
It means that while increased choice allows us to achieve objectively better results, it also leads to greater anxiety, indecision, paralysis, and dissatisfaction.
Overthinking lowers your performance

Our working memory is what allows us to focus on the information we need to get things done at the moment we’re doing them. It is also in limited supply. You can think of it like our brain’s computer memory. Once it’s used up, nothing more can fit in.

When you overanalyze a situation, the repetitive thoughts, anxiety, and self-doubt decrease the amount of working memory you have available to complete challenging tasks, causing your productivity to plummet.

Overthinking kills your creativity

A recent Stanford study suggests that over-thinking not only impedes our ability to perform cognitive tasks but keeps us from reaching our creative potential as well.

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