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How to Remember Anything You Really Want to Remember, Backed by Science

Use associative learning

Connect what you just learned to experiences you previously had.

Associative learning is the process of relating something new to something you already know.

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Remember anything

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How to Remember Anything You Really Want to Remember, Backed by Science

How to Remember Anything You Really Want to Remember, Backed by Science

https://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/how-to-remember-anything-you-really-want-to-remember-backed-by-science.html

inc.com

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Key Ideas

Quiz yourself

This is an extremely effective way to speed up the learning process.

If you quiz yourself and answer incorrectly,  you are more likely to remember the right answer after you look it up and you'll also remember the fact you didn't remember.

Summarize and share

Even just thinking that you'll need to teach someone can make you learn more effectively.

Teaching means seeking out key points and organizing information into a coherent structure. 

Use associative learning

Connect what you just learned to experiences you previously had.

Associative learning is the process of relating something new to something you already know.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Say it out loud

Learning and memory benefit from active involvement. When you add speaking to it, the content becomes more defined in long-term memory and more memorable.

Take notes by hand

Most of us can type very fast, but research shows writing your notes by hand will allow you to learn more.

Taking notes by hand enhances both comprehension and retention.

Chunk your study sessions

Studying over a period of time is more effective than waiting until the last minute.

Distributed practice works because each time you try to remember something, the memory becomes harder to forget.

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The Science of Memory
  1. Encoding - the stage when the brain consciously acknowledges information based on our senses. When we attach meaning or factual knowledge to any of this sensory input, that'...
Lifestyle Changes That Can Improve Memory
  • Get a good night's sleep or take a power nap after learning something new, to help retain and retrieve memories better. Sleep deprivation and acquisition of too much information will not help you save those memories.
  • Get moving, to improve the flow of oxygen-rich blood in your brain and to trigger neuron growth and new connections in the brain - critical for memory.
  • Improve your diet. Fats from food can build up the brain, resulting to poor blood flow.
Mnemonics

Any system or device designed to aid memory:

  • patterns of letters or words (common mnemonics)
  • ideas (memory palace)
  • associations (chunking)

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Practice makes perfect

Whether you’re learning to play the saxophone or studying a foreign language, practice, or repetition, makes perfect.

Repetition increases the myelin, or fatty coating, around the axioms tha...

Spaced repetition

Spacing out the repetition, rather than cramming it into one session, is more effective. To use this learning technique:

  • Start by establishing a manageable study schedule. 
  • Choose a method for storing and organizing information. 
  • Don’t forget to test yourself periodically. Tracking your progress will boost your motivation to continue.
Take time for reflection

In addition to solidifying what we’ve already learned, reflection also helps spark new ideas. And it usually happens when you're not working.

Our most creative ideas don't come when we're consciously focused on the problem. but when we're interacting with people, gaining experiences and letting our minds make connections.

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