Remain objective - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

8 Things Really Great Problem Solvers Do

Remain objective

Great problem solvers approach each new problem as though it were brand new. 

That way they can apply a specific solution to the problem instead of a fix that may go only partway.

154 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

8 Things Really Great Problem Solvers Do

8 Things Really Great Problem Solvers Do

https://www.inc.com/kevin-daum/8-things-really-great-problem-solvers-do.html

inc.com

8

Key Ideas

Remain objective

Great problem solvers approach each new problem as though it were brand new. 

That way they can apply a specific solution to the problem instead of a fix that may go only partway.

List the obstacles

Great problem solvers take a high-level view of the issues involved and jot down a list of all the potential factors that could get in the way of a solution. 

Identify the opportunity

So many times great opportunities are wrapped up inside simple problems.

The problem at hand may be symptomatic of bigger problems with your systems or perhaps your industry.

Break down silos

Great problem solvers are also great facilitators. 

They use their communication skills to help others share information so all bases are covered.

Translate research into action

Data and precedent are important but at some point, you just have to take action.

Get enough research to understand the issues and then engage your creativity to find new ways to better solve old issues.

Reverse engineer

Great problem solvers have the vision to picture the ideal working scenario and then construct the methodology that will achieve the desired effect.

Engage open-minded people

Great problem solvers know the best results come from groups of open-minded people.

Your problem-solving team must be willing to get outside of the box and uncomfortable.

Leave your ego aside

Often great solutions to problems are ignored because a leader wants the solution to be his or her idea.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Systems thinking

Is a way of seeing the world as a series of interconnected and interdependent systems rather than lots of independent parts. 

As a thinking tool, it seeks to oppose the reductioni...

Systems

...are sets of related components that work together in a particular environment to perform whatever functions are required to achieve the system's objective.

The 3 main systems at play
  • Social systems: rules and structures, created by humans, that keep society functioning.
  • Industrial systems: all manufactured material world, created to facilitate human needs.
  • The ecosystem: which provides all the natural services (clean air, food, fresh water, minerals and natural resources) needed for the other two systems to exist.
Small Thinking And Big Thinking

Companies, teams and individual achievers are sharply focused on achieving goals. But this focus on completion often limits the scope of the results and stifles innovation.

There is a ...

Create Specified Time For Thinking

Set aside time to tackle a problem and then use the entire time. Don't head for the door after the first good idea, as there may be bigger and better ideas to come.

Encourage Outside Learning

Bring facilitation techniques to encourage participation.

By giving team members time and resources to grow, learn, and explore you get a better quality and wider brainstorming. 

one more idea

Use the why lens

Great leaders only solve problems within their control. Ones connected to their biggest why. They ask:

  • Is this our problem?
  • Why should we solve this problem?
  • What ...
Problems as opportunities

Problems fuel great leaders, providing opportunities to learn and grow to the next level. 

The greater the problem, the hungrier they are for a solution. Leaders like Richard Branson, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates view problems as golden opportunities to disrupt the market and revolutionize the customer experience.

Acknowledging the problem

Great leaders acknowledge there is a problem and demonstrate the severity of the problem and the benefit of the solution to stakeholders, partners, and shareholders. 

This way, the leader not only takes responsibility for making the problem transparent, but he or she also explores different dimensions of the problem, consequently benefiting from others’ ideas.

2 more ideas

Basic steps to solving any problem
  • Understand the Problem, so you know you're actually focusing on the the real issue at hand.
  • Create a Plan, so you have a series of actionable steps to follow.
  • ...
Understand the Problem

Often the most difficult step, because it's easy to focus on the wrong part of the problem, or look at the problem too broadly.

The first thing you need to do is reduce it to its simplest and purest form so you know exactly what you're dealing with. While you're doing this, you need to ask yourself questions to make sure you're focusing on the right things. 

Create a Plan

You need a plan with actionable steps. Ask yourself what's barring you from moving forward and make step one. Step one will open doors to other steps. 

Consider which steps will open more doors, add them to the plan, and keep doing that until you get to your solution. Things will change as you act on the plan and you'll need to adapt, so it's best to keep your plan somewhat open-ended and try to include steps that involve preparing for trouble you can foresee. 

one more idea

Systematic approach
Most people jump straight from finding a problem to attempting to solve it.

Having a systematic approach to how you deal with problems, as opposed to just going by gut and feelings, ca...

Study the problem first

Detectives and investigators use the process. They ask both obvious and unthinkable questions.

Get close and collect information about how the problem is manifesting.  Understand where the problem does and doesn’t happen, when the problem started, and how often the problem occurs to generate critical insight for the problem-solving effort.

Question for great answers
  • Don’t look for solutions immediately; Keep redefining the problem until you arrive at the root cause.
  • Don’t try to guess the solution; try to understand how the obstacles, or challenges manifest first.
  • Gather data to analyze all potential root causes.
  • Consider all options, regardless of how irrelevant they currently appear.
  • Find a way to connect the dots. Make better analogies. One good analogy is worth three hours of discussion.

6 more ideas

Name memory
Popular people remember the names of those they meet.

Calling someone by name makes a person feel recognized and appreciated.

Listening skills

Popular people do not focus on themselves, their problems, or their achievements.

They are active listeners, asking a few questions to encourage others to talk. They do not expect perfection and tolerate the weaknesses of others well.

Positive attitude

Likable people are always positive and optimistic.

They are very grateful for the things they have in life and do not focus on the things they lack.

7 more ideas

Brainstorming

It encourages people to come up with thoughts and ideas that can, at first, seem a bit crazy. Some of these ideas can be crafted into original, creative solutions to a problem, while others can ...

Brainstorming for problem solving
  • It brings team members' diverse experience into play. It increases the richness of ideas explored, which means that you can often find better solutions.
  • It can help you get buy-in from team members for the solution chosen – after all, they're likely to be more committed to an approach if they were involved in developing it. 
  • It helps team members bond, as they solve problems in a positive, rewarding environment.
Why individual brainstorming might bring better results
  • groups aren't always strict in following the rules of brainstorming, and bad behaviors creep in
  • people pay so much attention to other people that they don't generate ideas of their own – or they forget these ideas while they wait for their turn to speak. 

On your own, you don't have to worry about other people's egos or opinions, and you can be freer and more creative.

3 more ideas

Develop The Habit Of Thinking Big

... by trial and error and consistently analyzing things related to big ideas, until you've practiced enough your brain can easily establish unusual correlati...

Think Like a Child

The key to shifting your perspective and developing the habit of thinking big involves stepping outside of yourself and into another persona — essentially becoming someone who will help you see things bigger, better and more creatively.

You must also think from the perspective of having no limitations or fears and ask big questions persistently until the right answer comes to mind.

Barriers To Thinking Big
  • Limiting habits: procrastination, immediatism, negative thinking, making excuses, solving insignificant problems, over-analyzing, perfectionism.
  • People criticize and judge the unknown and big ideas are often so.
  • Fears of failure and the unknown restrict us to small thoughts, decisions, and actions. 
  • Lack of time turns us into small thinkers and immediatists. 
  • Lack of incentives robs you of the motivation to stretch yourself emotionally or physically. 

13 more ideas

Deduction and Mindfulness Go Together

Sherlock Holmes observed facts without being judgmental. He would construct a hypothesis about what he believed happened. He would then search for more evidence to logically validate his ini...

All Stories Are Possible — Until They Are Not

Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot encourages everybody to tell their story.  Stories help Poirot comprehend what kind of person the victim was. And to uncover the murderer’ motive.

Storytelling is powerful to uncover insights, not just the truth. Design Thinking — a process for creative problem solving — leverages the power of stories to detect human desires and needs.

Be Relentless

Sarah Linden is the least self-aware television detective.

Her dedication to her work and stubbornness are unbeatable. She never gives up. Even though she fails in many aspects of her life — like being a mother. But, she keeps showing up and trying to do better. She tries again, fails again, and fails better.

5 more ideas

Ask questions

It helps you preserve your neutrality.
It is effective in getting others to pause, reflect, and get clear with themselves about what the problem actually is. 
You may get each ...

Be mindful during a conflict situation
  • All issues are best dealt with as soon as all involved are calm.
  • Start with one-on-one conversations to get the details of the issue from both perspectives.
  • Recognize that there is no objective reality of the situation.
Probing questions to ask

Once you have the basics of what happened and how long it has been going on, you can move on to asking more probing questions:

  • What is the other person saying?
  • How does what you've been hearing go against your values?
  • What is the difference between your two perspectives?
  • What aspects of this conflict do you believe you're responsible for?
  • Can you put yourself in your coworker's shoes? How does she feel?
  • If we were to think outside of the box, how could this issue be resolved?
  • What will happen to you if this issue isn't resolved through this discussion?
  • What would you offer to do or change to help resolve this issue? What would you like in return?