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How To Make The Most Out Of Your Time And Your Life

You can't blame technology

While endless scrolling on your phone is a symptom of the problem, it is not the root cause of why you find it hard to focus.

To learn how to focus, you must adopt new skills as well as understand the most common causes of distraction.

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How To Make The Most Out Of Your Time And Your Life

How To Make The Most Out Of Your Time And Your Life

https://www.nirandfar.com/focus/

nirandfar.com

7

Key Ideas

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

“Few things are sadder than encountering a person who knows exactly what he should do, yet cannot muster enough energy to do it.”

Intense focus

It happens only when:

  • You define your goals clearly 
  • You have the capacity to complete the tasks necessary to achieve them.

You can't blame technology

While endless scrolling on your phone is a symptom of the problem, it is not the root cause of why you find it hard to focus.

To learn how to focus, you must adopt new skills as well as understand the most common causes of distraction.

Why you can't focus

  • You’re stuck in an unhealthy rut, that teaches your brain to automatically escape hard work instead of working through it.
  • You don’t know how to focus on things you don't like. If you like doing something, you are more likely to do it Reframe the tasks you dislike, to make them come enjoyable.
  • You’re telling yourself you “Don’t have time.” This is a passive way of emphasizing that a task is not a priority for you.

Timeboxing

By selecting parts of your day for specific tasks you are more likely to use your time the way you intended.

The best time management technique is deciding what you want to do and when you want to do it.

Get and stay focused

  • Learn to complain better: instead of focusing on the problem, adopt a solution-oriented approach.
  • Schedule your indulgences: by setting aside time for the things likely to distract you, you ensure to control them instead of letting them control you.
  • Control your triggers: interruptions negatively affected both the quality and quantity of work produced.

Internal and external triggers

  • External triggers: cellphones, work colleagues etc. They take us off track when we planned to focus.
  • Internal triggers: they  come from within. They are uncomfortable emotional states you seek to escape.

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