Mind Your Tone - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

7 Strategies Emotionally Intelligent People Use to Keep Their Feelings Under Control

Mind Your Tone

We tend to respond to people using the same tone they use to speak to us.

If you need to have an emotionally charged conversation, speak in a way that's calm and collected. And if a discussion begins to escalate, focus on softening your tone or lowering your voice; others are likely to mimic you.

337 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

7 Strategies Emotionally Intelligent People Use to Keep Their Feelings Under Control

7 Strategies Emotionally Intelligent People Use to Keep Their Feelings Under Control

https://www.inc.com/justin-bariso/7-simple-strategies-that-will-help-you-manage-your-emotions.html

inc.com

13

Key Ideas

Pause

Pausing gives you time to stop and think before you act. Doing so can prevent you from doing things you'll later regret.

If you feel your emotions getting out of control, take a pause. If possible, go for a short walk. Once you calm down, return and decide how to move forward. 

Mind Your Tone

We tend to respond to people using the same tone they use to speak to us.

If you need to have an emotionally charged conversation, speak in a way that's calm and collected. And if a discussion begins to escalate, focus on softening your tone or lowering your voice; others are likely to mimic you.

Mute

Sharing your opinion when others are aggravated can be counterproductive. If things get emotional, and you can’t leave, you may need to stop talking and let them express their feelings.

Breathe deeply and remember that moods are temporary. And that their words at this point may be extreme or exaggerated; resist the urge to respond in kind. Often, once they let everything out, they'll calm down. 

Record

Recording means concentrated listening, with the intent to learn more about another's perspective. You're not trying to figure out how to reply; instead, you're listening to understand.

As you tune into another, don't judge or offer advice. Instead, focus on learning more about how the other person sees you, how they see themselves, and how they see the situation.

Examine The Issue

Emotionally charged discussions are often rooted in deep-seated issues that will continue springing up if left alone. Carefully think about where, when, and how to reintroduce the subject, and do it once everyone's had the chance to cool down.

Opening with an apology, an expression of thanks, or by acknowledging where you and your communication partner agree may lead the other person to lower their guard and become more open to whatever you have to say.

Think Of The Consequences

Forget about how you feel in the moment. Pause, step back and think of the short-term and long-term consequences of your actions.

Doing so can help you think clearly, see the big picture, and make better decisions.

Slow Down

Slowing down to analyze your negative emotions can help you figure out the underlying reasons behind your feelings and lead you to potential solutions.

Ask yourself why you feel a certain way and what you need to change it. This can give you control of your feelings instead of leaving them in control of you.

2. Mind Your Tone

We tend to respond to people using the same tone they use to speak to us.

If you need to have an emotionally charged conversation, speak in a way that's calm and collected. And if a discussion begins to escalate, focus on softening your tone or lowering your voice, others are likely to mimic you.

3. Mute

Sharing your opinion when others are aggravated can be counterproductive. If things get emotional, and you can’t leave, you may need to stop talking and let them express their feelings.

Breathe deeply and remember that moods are temporary. And that their words at this point may be extreme or exaggerated; resist the urge to respond in kind. Often, once they let everything out, they'll calm down. 

4. Record

Recording is concentrated listening, with the intent to learn more about another's perspective. You're not trying to figure out how to reply; instead, you're listening to understand.

As you tune into another, don't judge or offer advice. Instead, focus on learning more about how the other person sees you, how they see themselves, and how they see the situation.

5. Examine The Issue

Emotionally charged discussions are often rooted in deep-seated issues that will continue springing up if left alone. Carefully think about where, when, and how to reintroduce the subject, and do it once everyone's had the chance to cool down.

Opening with an apology, an expression of thanks, or by acknowledging where you and your communication partner agree may lead the other person to lower their guard and become more open to whatever you have to say.

6. Think Of The Consequences

Forget about how you feel in the moment. Pause, step back and think of the short-term and long-term consequences of your actions.

Doing so can help you think clearly, see the big picture, and make better decisions.

7. Slow Down

Slowing down to analyze your negative emotions can help you figure out the underlying reasons behind your feelings and lead you to potential solutions.

Ask yourself why you feel a certain way and what you need to change it can give you control of your feelings instead of leaving them in control of you.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Great Leaders

Knowledge, smarts and vision are characteristic of a great leader. Add to these the ability to identify and monitor emotions (your own and others) and to manage relationships. 

Qual...

Self-Awareness
  • Realistic self-confidence: You recognize your own abilities and shortcomings; you operate from competence and know when to rely on someone else.
  • Emotional insight: You are aware of your own feelings. You can identify the cause of the emotions to help you manage them.
Self-Management
  • Resilience: You know how to stay calm under pressure and can recover quickly from upsets. 
  • Emotional balance: You can control any distressful feelings without blowing up at people.
  • Self-motivation: You keep moving toward long-term goals despite setbacks.

2 more ideas

Emotions

Our emotions are an integral part of our lives.
They protect us by alerting us to danger. They add colour to our lives and help us find meaning ...

We can't really control our feelings

But we can control our reactions to those feelings.

By increasing our awareness of emotions and their effects, and then focusing on our thoughts, we can learn to manage our emotional reactions effectively.

"The Neftlix method" to control emotions
  • The pause button. Create a habit of thoughtful action. Train yourself to take a moment to stop and think before you act or speak.
  • Volume control. Train yourself to recognise when your volume is starting to go up.
  • The tuning dial. As you'd change the film or change the channel, instead of focusing on what you're going to say next, tune in to the other person and listen carefully with the goal to truly understand them.
  • Mute. Hit the mute button if the other person is in a highly emotional state because sharing your point of view won't help at that moment.
  • Record. As you stay on mute, focus on mentally recording key points they're willing to share to help you learn more about their perspective.
  • Playback. Emotionally charged discussions are often rooted in deep-seated issues. Revisit the topic once both parties have had the time to cool down.
  • Fast forward. Think about the effects your actions will have in the long run.
Emotional intelligence when facing uncertainty
Emotional intelligence when facing uncertainty
As we face uncertainty, our brains push us to overreact in a place where emotions, such as anxiety and fear, are generated. And these inhibit good decisio...
Strategies to improve the quality of your decisions
  • Be wary of fear and spot it as soon as it begins to surface.
  • Stay positive. 
  • Know what you know—and what you don’t.
  • Embrace that which you can’t control. 
  • Focus only on what matters. 
  • Don’t seek perfection - it leaves you lamenting what you failed to accomplish instead of enjoying what you were able to achieve.
  • Don’t dwell on problems. Rather focus on actions to better yourself.
  • Recognize when you are overly influenced by your assumptions and emotions or by another person’s opinion.
  • Have a contingency plan without asking "What if?"
Emotions

They are basal responses that begin in the subcortical areas of the brain responsible for producing biochemical reactions to environmental stimuli that have a direct impact on our physical state.&n...

Feelings

Feelings are preceded by emotions and tend to be our reactions to them. Emotions are a more generalized experience across humans, but feelings are more subjective and influenced by our personal experiences and interpretations, thus they are harder to measure.

Negative Emotions

They can be defined as unpleasant or unhappy emotions evoked in individuals to express a negative effect towards something.

Although some are labeled negative, all emotions are normal to the human experience. And it’s important to understand when and why negative emotions might arise, and develop positive behaviors to address them.

6 more ideas

A Zen Parable
There was a man riding on a horse. When a man walking on the road asks him where he is going, the rider replies, “Why are you asking me? You should ask the horse.”

The ho...

Emotional Intelligence

The ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions. -Salovey and Mayer (1990)

Emotional Mastery

It manifests itself in the kind of statements we make about ourselves, in relation to our emotional skills and success.

Qualities such as confidence, awareness and optimism, come under the umbrella of emotional intelligence. 

4 more ideas

Emotional Intelligence (EI)
Emotional Intelligence (EI)

The ability to recognize and appropriately react to feelings in yourself and the people around you, particularly when it comes to handling stress and frustration.

4 Ways to build your emotional intelligence
  • Study yourself. Pay attention to your reactions and behaviours to get a better understanding of your emotional responses.
  • Manage emotions during stressful situations by breathing correctly. Breathe deep and steady through the nose with a relaxed ribcage to lower stress in the body.
  • Channel your emotions. Transform negative energies into positive ones by redirecting them to fuel new opportunities.

  • Transmute your emotions. Try to transform negative feelings such as anger, hatred, pain, and jealousy into positive ones such as love, admiration, compassion and kindness.

4 Steps To Controlling Anger
  1. Leave: getting away from the situation prevents regrettable instinctive reactions.
  2. Breathe deeply: research indicates deep breathing and repeating a ca...
Finding Emotional Balance

Recognizing that you need to choose your battles keeps you from becoming overly anxious and burning out.

Although anger can be positive and lead to action against unacceptable situations, thinking of the consequences of your reactions leads to more effective strategies.

Emotional intelligence (EQ)

The ability to recognize and understand emotions, and use that information to guide decision making.