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Society's Problem With Patience

Busy With Short Attention Spans

We all have mastered the art of being busy, with zero or little attention spans, and are getting incapable of focusing on and pursuing a singular goal.

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Society's Problem With Patience

Society's Problem With Patience

https://medium.com/the-polymath-project/societys-problem-with-patience-a6b54a51b365

medium.com

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Key Ideas

Patience

Patience is the simple recognition that things take time. That achieving greatness and creating a masterpiece takes time. It takes the ability and willingness to be frustrated. To overcome difficulties and to persevere.

Overnight success stories

Media feeds us the idea of the overnight success stories that make it seem that in just a few weeks or months, someone could become a billionaire or a superstar.

They fail to highlight the years of toil, luck and hard work, and the entire background that led to the success, just reporting the end result.

Technology is making us impatient

Our brains are being re-wired by the constant distraction & interaction with digital devices

Social media and smartphones drain our time, and suck our mental energy, even changing the chemistry of the brain. And our constantly distracted state of mind is having a serious effect on our creativity.

Busy With Short Attention Spans

We all have mastered the art of being busy, with zero or little attention spans, and are getting incapable of focusing on and pursuing a singular goal.

Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy

“The two most powerful warriors are patience and time.” 

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Crafts
Crafts

Handicrafts such as crochet, knitting, and embroidery—traditionally practiced by women and by the elderly—carry passive associations.

Counting the movements of hooks and needles, row afte...

Crafts during difficult times
  • In Ireland, during the famine of the 1840s, crochet schools were established to train impoverished farming families to make lace for export that grew into an art form.
  • During World War I, French peasant women cross-stitched military scenes that were sold to raise funds.
  • After the war, shell-shocked soldiers were prescribed embroidery therapy.
  • In London, people sheltering from the blitz were encouraged to pass the time by knitting.
Make something

Many have turned to yarn crafts as a form of stress relief.

You can learn too. To crochet, or knit, or cross-stitch is to make something and to make sense of it, creating something lasting out of solitude.

Reading in the digital age

Online life makes us into a new kind of reader: Our attention fractures. Online reading is about clicks, and comments, and points. 

The opposite of the traditional reading ex...

Not every emotion can be reduced to an emoji, and not every thought can be conveyed via tweet.

Not every emotion can be reduced to an emoji, and not every thought can be conveyed via tweet.

Cynical Readers

We have become cynical readers – we read in the disjointed, goal-oriented way that online life encourages & we stop exercising our attention. 

We read just as much if not more. We live in a text-gorged society in which the most fleeting thought is a thumb-dash away from posterity. It's how we read that changed.

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Time is Limited Yet Abundant

Most of us conflict with time. Time is a paradox and is both limited and abundant at the same time. We can do great things with time, provided we know how to use this invis...

Use Time Intentionally

Once we realize that every moment is a gift, we will not waste it but use it intentionally, for something important and meaningful.

It is important that we set some clear priorities and create space for them. 

Contemplating Death

This exercise makes us value our limited time and sheds away the unnecessary activities from our day. 

We start living a vivid life, and slow down, becoming fully present in the moment, savoring time like a limited edition treat before it vanishes.

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