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How to Overcome Your Demons | Mark Manson

The shadow metaphor

The shadow metaphor

Carl Jung defined shadow as all of the parts of ourselves that we despise or loathe and therefore hide and avoid. It is impossible to run away or lose your shadow because ultimately, your shadow is a representation of you. 

No shadow can exist without a source of light. To rid yourself of your shadow would require you to rid yourself of the light in your life and thus, live in utter darkness. But denying our shadows and everything they contain is a source of a great deal of human suffering.

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