Weather is affected by climate - Deepstash

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Don't Be Fooled: Weather Is Not Climate

Weather is affected by climate

A cold day or month or even a year doesn't mean the climate is not heating up. However, a changing climate can make certain extreme events more likely. Climate change will make heavy rainfall even heavier, and heatwaves hotter and more frequent.

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Looking At The Big Picture

Ask yourself these questions:

  • Values: What do I like to do? What brings out my best?
  • Vision: How do I want to grow? What do I want to create for myself?

"Incremental efforts add up. You don’t have to do a big dramatic thing to make progress. What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while."

"Incremental efforts add up. You don’t have to do a big dramatic thing to make progress. What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while."

Don’t Wait Until You’re Unhappy

We tend to only do something about our careers when we have a problem. But if you wait until you’re laid off or dissatisfied, you may take action but it won’t feel authentic.

A better way is to look at multiple factors and work on them consistently even when you feel satisfied at your job.

Denying Your Own Creativity

That’s a self-imposed and self-limiting belief. Stop that.

Creativity is a requirement for problem-solving and we all problem-solve. Acknowledge that you're inherently creative,

Being Afraid Of Being Wrong

We hate being wrong, but mistakes often teach us the most and allow us to innovate.

Think of the pros and cons of trying something and then free yourself to do it. If it doesn't work, take what you learn, and try something else. 

Being Too "Serious"

The persona of the fool allows the truth to be told, without the usual ramifications that might come with speaking against social conventions. Give yourself permission to be a fool and see things for what they really are.

The Error in Isolating Events
The Error in Isolating Events
  • Many studies have been conducted regarding the psychological impact of a one particular event, like the trauma associated with the ongoing health crisis, or sudden job loss....
Good News, Bad News

A comprehensive study on Australian households, measuring the quality of wellbeing over 16 years found the following results:

  1. The biggest emotional scars come from deaths, divorce, and heavy financial losses.
  2. Negative events linger in the mind for much longer than the positive ones.
  3. The emotional costs involved with separation (like from a spouse) can be significant, and should be avoided unless completely necessary.
  4. Problems rarely come all at once, and most people recover, showing resilience and adaptability.
You Remain What You Are

Our level of wellbeing does not change much, with each event, even a catastrophic one, impacting us for a length of time, say a year or two, and then becoming normal to our minds, returning us to our previous levels of wellbeing.

This applies to boosts as well as the plunges.