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7 Psychological Benefits of Playfulness for Adults

Growing Up

As we get educated and become adults, we get tied up in our accomplishments and careers, following the generally accepted ways of living and behaving in society. We become stuck in a self-made routine and rigidity, taking life too seriously.

Ultimately, in this routine of work, responsibility and life's affairs, misery sets in, giving rise to boredom, depression, and stale relationships.

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7 Psychological Benefits of Playfulness for Adults

7 Psychological Benefits of Playfulness for Adults

https://nickwignall.com/benefits-of-playfulness/

nickwignall.com

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Key Ideas

Growing Up

As we get educated and become adults, we get tied up in our accomplishments and careers, following the generally accepted ways of living and behaving in society. We become stuck in a self-made routine and rigidity, taking life too seriously.

Ultimately, in this routine of work, responsibility and life's affairs, misery sets in, giving rise to boredom, depression, and stale relationships.

Playfulness

Playfulness is the lesser-known and under-appreciated antidote to unhappiness, boredom, and stuckness of life.

Trumping Anxiety

Playfulness outcompetes worry and anxiety.

Most people find it hard to worry less, so the way out is to find something playful to do, a distraction or a hobby, or get into mindfulness meditation.

Playfulness And Freedom

As we become less rigid and constrained, our playful nature builds new, unexplored connections and makes us see possibilities we missed before.

Better Relations

Playfulness is associated with being childish or superficial, which is a myth. A playful person tends to be vulnerable and intimate, resulting in better relationships. 

If we are not depressed, addicted to substances, or sad, we tend to have lesser relationship issues.

Playfulness And Stress

Playfulness works as good as deep breathing or mindfulness meditation to remove any stress you may have.

We need to stop exhausting our brain analyzing, judging, comparing, and solving complex problems in our lives and just play for some time.

Playfulness And Creative Thinking

We become smarter and more creative as we get more playful, as we start to think flexibly and outside the box.

Games and certain exercises that jog our brain in creative ways gives us a much needed mental break.

Develop and Harness New Skills

If we are working towards developing a new skill, like learning to play the guitar, or a new language, it helps to turn it into a playful game.

Playfulness In Your Identity

As we play games, learn new skills and meet new people, refining our work and focusing our energy positively, we start to nurture and build our identity, resulting in diversification and new ways of earning money.

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Re-educating Our Inner Critic

We do not need to suppress or kill our inner critic, but only need to re-educate it, but only need to deploy three simple ways to make space for the inner child:

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  2. Skip doing something adults do in favour of doing something that kids love to do, like drawing, writing poems and playing in the pool.
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Children are extremely curious. They keep asking, "why?" and explore new things just because they want to know.

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The mechanics of curiosity

Research around curiosity found that children at age 5 scored 98% on a creativity test. When the same children took the test at age 10, only 30% scored well on the test. By age 15, only 12% of the same children did well. Less than 2% of adults are defined as creative based on their answer to this standardised test.

Science suggests this decrease in curiosity could be caused when we feel there's no gap between what we know and what we want to know, so we just stop being curious.

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Most grown-ups don't realize that they are not grown-ups at all, but emotionally wounded children inhabiting adult bodies. And a wounded inner child is the root cause of bad relationships, bad career, and of the persistent negative emotions of fear, anxiety, insecurity, and inferiority.

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Building walls create a safe space into which you can quickly retreat, but it also leaves you trapped behind your own emotional defenses, unable to give or receive positive emotions as well as negative ones. 

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From Protecting to Forgiving Yourself

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