Reinventing childhood - Deepstash

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The best parts of your childhood probably involved things today's kids will never know

Reinventing childhood

It is only as adults that we are able to recognize all the factors that made us into who we are today.

A healthy childhood is a privilege. But even children who do grow up in a stable environment may not have the kind of adventurous, family-oriented, independent childhood that should be the norm. Maybe it's time for a change.

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