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Every kid needs to feel seen - here are 2 ways you can do this

Just Show Up

If one adult in a child's life constantly shows up for them, they turn out better in:

  • Happiness Quotient
  • Academic Success
  • Leadership Skills
  • Meaningful Relationships

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Every kid needs to feel seen - here are 2 ways you can do this

Every kid needs to feel seen - here are 2 ways you can do this

https://ideas.ted.com/every-kid-needs-to-feel-seen-here-are-2-ways-you-can-do-this/

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Key Ideas

The Four S's

Showing up for your child is easy to do. A child should be made to feel Safe, Seen, Soothed and Secure.

When we show up and give our children an opportunity to be seen, honestly and directly, then we act as a living mirror for them to see themselves.


Don't Deny Their Feelings

While we reassure our kids telling them what they are feeling is not going to be a problem, and they shouldn't cry or worry, we are ignoring their feelings.

Acknowledging what they feel is as important as correcting their course.

Observe, Feel and Witness

Instead of being immediately judgemental of your child's behavior, we need to participate and look with clarity. Discard all preconceived notions.

Example: If a child throws the spaghetti plate on the floor, you might be angry, but if you look at his real intention of doing so, maybe curious to see how the splatter looks on the floor, you might respond a bit differently.

Create Space and Time

Intentionally creating a time and space, maybe in the evening to see and talk to your child, looking and learning, is a great way to helping your kids feel seen and heard.

Your presence is more important than your usual routine of the evening.

Beyond Small Talk

If the talk between a parent and a child is forced and mechanical, then the child may dread it.

The time spent together has to be natural, honest and full of deep understanding, not some work you have to do to groom your child.

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