Constructively confront someone - Deepstash

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An Adult's Guide to Social Skills, for Those Who Were Never Taught

Constructively confront someone

Our own fears keep us from confronting others. We fear that we'll lose something, hurt someone we care about, or that it will accomplish nothing.

  • Recognize that fear in yourself and identify the real issues that led to the conflict.
  • When you are able to discuss the issue, instead of firing accusations, describe your behavior using "I" statements: "I feel hurt that .............................."

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Avoid Common Argument Fallacies

Winning an argument often comes down to who can go the longest without contradicting themselves and keeping sound logic, not direct persuasion of the other party.

Anecdotal Fallacy

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