Exploiting our mental shortcuts - Deepstash

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Why we fall for phishing emails - and how we can protect ourselves

Exploiting our mental shortcuts

Phishing emails manipulate us via mental shortcuts. There are seven shortcuts or psychological principles of influence that can be exploited by phishers. These include authority, commitment, liking, perceptual contrast, reciprocation, scarcity and social proof.

An example of reciprocity could be getting an emailed coupon and being asked to click on a button to sign up for the retailer's newsletter. 

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Bottomless visual
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