deepstash

Beta

The perils of constant feedback

The App Notification Analogy

When we observe App notifications, there is a correlation between the number of notifications sent by the App and the probability that the user opens it.

If the number of notifications is high, there is a greater chance of the user opening the app, while at the same time, a greater risk of annoying the user. This analogy plays the same in the area of the feedback that we receive for our actions.

63 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The perils of constant feedback

The perils of constant feedback

https://tjcx.me/posts/feedback-learning-rate/

tjcx.me

3

Key Ideas

The App Notification Analogy

When we observe App notifications, there is a correlation between the number of notifications sent by the App and the probability that the user opens it.

If the number of notifications is high, there is a greater chance of the user opening the app, while at the same time, a greater risk of annoying the user. This analogy plays the same in the area of the feedback that we receive for our actions.

Absorbing Feedback

The Gradient Descent, which is a machine learning technique used in a neural network, provides us with this insight:

  • If we take absorb too much feedback for our actions towards our goal, we will move extremely slow and can fall back or settle for some mediocre solution.
  • If we ignore all feedback and just act, we may probably never reach our goal.

    Changing Your Feedback Frequency

    The way to overcome the problem of "Feedback Frequency" is to change your 'Step Size', which is inversely proportional to the feedback received. This is done by:

    • Slowly Decreasing Step Size: Take less feedback in the beginning but increasing it as you move closer towards your goal.
    • Cycling between small and big Step Size: Taking less and more feedback in intervals.
    • Increasing the momentum of Step Size: Taking more feedback in the beginning and as you learn, decrease the amount of feedback and move forward faster, using the momentum.

      EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

      SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

      Mark Twain

      “It ain’t what you know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”

      Mark Twain
      The most useful learning
      Most people think about learning as adding knowledge and skills. You now have a new fact in your mind that didn’t exist before.

      The most useful learning isn’t usually a strict addition of new knowledge, but first unlearning something false or unhelpful.

      Types of Unlearning
      • Straightforward refutation of the old idea. This complete refutation is atypical. More likely the new knowledge doesn’t contradict the old one, but it may modify it in some way.
      • The new knowledge revises a simpler picture by filling it with more complex details. This is similar to adding new knowledge, although because the older, simpler view of the issue has been overwritten with more detail, there is some unlearning going on.

      3 more ideas

      The 4 R’s of Receiving Feedback
      • Respond: Just say “Thank you.”
      • Record: You will rarely have time to process feedback right away. But don’t trust your memory for later. Record the details.
      • ...
      The prevalent theory of dishonesty

      From a legal perspective, dishonesty is the idea of cost-benefit analysis. When people think about being dishonest, they wonder what can be gained or what can be lost. If the cost of lying is too h...

      The slippery slope

      People often feel the need to rationalize their dishonesty. The danger is taking that first step.

      The story of Joe Papp, an Olympic cyclist falls into this category. Papp consulted his physician, who wrote Papp a prescription for erythropoietin (EPO), a cancer treatment that increases the production of red blood cells. Papp injected himself, but also imported and distributed EPO to his team and to other teams. This essentially made him a drug dealer.

      Morals or ethics tilt behaviors 

      People that are required to put their signature at the top of a document instead of the bottom are more likely to provide truthful information.

      They are confirming that the information they’re about to provide is true before they have a chance to falsify it.