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Productivity shame: Why you never feel like you've done "enough"

The Spiral of Productivity Shame

Productivity shame is a feeling that you are not doing enough, whatever the number of hours you are working, or the number of tasks you are crossing off your to-do list. It also means you feel guilty when you rest or take time off watching a movie or just play around for a while. All of this is harmful and can lead to stress and burnout.

Productivity shame creates a cycle of failure and is a terrible and negative approach towards getting others to work.

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Productivity shame: Why you never feel like you've done "enough"

Productivity shame: Why you never feel like you've done "enough"

https://blog.rescuetime.com/productivity-shame/

blog.rescuetime.com

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Key Ideas

The Spiral of Productivity Shame

Productivity shame is a feeling that you are not doing enough, whatever the number of hours you are working, or the number of tasks you are crossing off your to-do list. It also means you feel guilty when you rest or take time off watching a movie or just play around for a while. All of this is harmful and can lead to stress and burnout.

Productivity shame creates a cycle of failure and is a terrible and negative approach towards getting others to work.

Causes of Productivity Shame

  • We link our products to our self-worth, thinking that we need to get more done, and our self-esteem depends upon it.
  • We set unrealistic goals, which can be discouraging for us if we keep on focusing on the end result.
  • We compare ourselves with others, who seemingly are doing better and are more productive.

Overcoming Productivity Shame

  • Disconnect your Self-worth from your achievements.
  • Set realistic, effective goals: The three elements of goal-setting are knowing what you want to achieve, how you're going to get there, and why you want to achieve something. If you have a compelling reason and motivation, go for it.
  • Appreciate progress: Consistent progress aids productivity better than the achieving of goals. 

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