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The Subtle Art of Connecting With Anyone

Shared Culture in Personal Relations

One of the reasons for bonding between groups of people is the shared culture that they have created. Culture is an invisible presence, a set of beliefs, history and rituals that encapsulates the values of the group, their conduct and their vision. This applies to movements, companies, and families.

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The Subtle Art of Connecting With Anyone

The Subtle Art of Connecting With Anyone

https://designluck.com/connecting-with-anyone/

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Key Ideas

Shared Culture in Personal Relations

One of the reasons for bonding between groups of people is the shared culture that they have created. Culture is an invisible presence, a set of beliefs, history and rituals that encapsulates the values of the group, their conduct and their vision. This applies to movements, companies, and families.

Large Groups Vs Small

A culture created in a two-way relationship or a small group is positive and open because it allows for differences to exist, which are not allowed by large groups in which cultures are attached to your identity.

Creating the right kind of culture organically is the magic of a strong relationship, something that is difficult in large groups with a shared ideology.

Connections and Happiness

The idea of a complete and fulfilling life is always related to personal relationships. Happiness, in a way, is the other person. Happiness is our connections, and the relationships we foster, which create and shape us.

It's a lost art to cultivate personal relationships without agenda or motive, just connecting and trying to understand and relate to different people.

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Chemistry vs. compatibility
  • Compatibility refers to the similarities between lifestyles and values that form the relationship without too much forcing or compromising on anyone’s part.
  • Chemistry
Judging people

Don't judge someone by the information they put in an online profile. They may look like a perfect fit, but lack the chemistry when you finally meet in person.

Similarly, it can be easy to write someone off because your ideals don't match on paper. Who's to know if you won't have chemistry in real life?

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Intimacy requires both partners to share and disclose concerns from time to time. But men and women have very different tolerances for "relationship talk, " which requires sacrifice from both to...

Having Separate Lives

Being independent, having your own interests, activities, and friends add excitement and freshness to relationships. But couples who live parallel lives and don't invite their spouse into their world on a regular basis tend to grow apart and be unhappy over the long term.

Perfect Relationsh And Conflict

Lack of conflict may just mean that you’re not dealing with existing issues. And research indicates that couples who report no conflict are not very happy over time.

Don't shy away from difficult conversations. Learning how to disagree in a healthy, productive manner is a key component of happy relationships.

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