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Universal Laws of the World

Parkinson’s Law

Work expands to fill the time available for its completion.
This can also be applied to other ideas. For instance, expenses expand to fill an income, or data can expand to fill a given level of storage.

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Universal Laws of the World

Universal Laws of the World

https://www.collaborativefund.com/blog/laws/

collaborativefund.com

11

Key Ideas

Littlewood's law

John Littlewood's law of miracles states that we can expect "miracles" to happen often.
If we see and hear things happening at a rate of one per second, the total number of events that happen to us in a month will be about a million. The chance of a miracle is about one per million events. Therefore we should expect about one miracle every month.

Gibson’s law

“For every PhD, there is an equal and opposite PhD.” 

In law and public policy, for every qualified expert witness, there is an expert witness that will come to the opposite conclusion.

Brandolini's law

"The amount of energy needed to refute bullsh*t is an order of magnitude bigger than to produce it."

Albert Brandolini's law acknowledges four truths:

  • People don't like to admit when they don't understand something. When they are confronted with nonsense, they will rather agree than admit they don't understand.
  • In law, the burden of proof lies with the prosecution (You often can't prove something didn't happen).
  • Bad commentary gives readers a cover to hide their own biases and prejudices.
  • Publishing an opinion has become very easy in the last two decades.

Goodhart’s law

When a measure becomes a target, it stops being a good measure.
Charles Goodhart is an economist who recognized that once you set a new policy target, the authority involved has his reputation attached to meet that target successfully and may neglect or adjust his behavior and procedures for that target.

Dollo's law

Dollo's law of irreversibility states that an organism can't re-evolve to a former state. The path that led to its former state was so intricate that it is impossible to retrace that exact path.

This law affects businesses and brands. Some things are hard to build, and once lost, will likely never be regained.

Parkinson’s Law

Work expands to fill the time available for its completion.
This can also be applied to other ideas. For instance, expenses expand to fill an income, or data can expand to fill a given level of storage.

Wiio’s laws

“Communication usually fails, except by accident.”

Osmo Wiio, a Finnish journalist, also made other laws of communication, such as:

  • “If a message can be understood in different ways, it will be understood in just that way which does the most harm.”
  • “In mass communication, the important thing is not how things are but how they seem to be.”

Sayre’s law

In a dispute, the intensity of emotions is inversely related to the value of the issues at stake.

When the stakes are actually high, people are willing to put their differences aside for a common cause.

Stigler’s law

No scientific discovery is named after its original discoverer.

Discoveries are most often the result of a combination of existing discoveries that solve a problem with an old invention.

The famous person is often the one who communicates an idea the best, not whose idea is the best.

Mill Mistakes

Assuming the familiar is the best.

You are in danger of thinking your own ideas are better because they are familiar. Your mind will always give your ideas more credit over other ideas that are better, but harder to explain.

Hickam’s dictum

Problems in complex systems rarely have one cause.
Doctor John Hickam observed that a patient is likely to have a few common problems and rarely just one. To try and get to the one underlying cause is likely to be a misdiagnosis.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Voltaire

“History never repeats itself. Man always does.”

Voltaire

History lessons

The most important lessons from history are the takeaways that are so broad they can apply to other fields, other historical times, and other people. 

The point is that the more specific a lesson of history is, the less relevant it becomes.

Adopting new views 

One of the interesting parts of the Great Depressions from history is not just how the economy collapsed, but how quickly and dramatically people’s views changed when it did.

People suffering from immediate, unexpected adversity are likely to adopt views they previously thought absurd. It’s not until your life is in full chaos (with your hopes and dreams your dreams unsure) that people begin taking ideas they’d never consider before seriously.

4 more ideas

Seven universal plots

Seven universal plots

There are only seven plots that are so fundamental to the way we tell stories that every storyteller uses one of them: Overcoming Monsters, Rags to Riches, The Quest, Voyage and Return Rebirth,...

Economic history

Looking for a few universal plot patterns reveals things fundamental to how all people think, which are likely to be repeated in the future and relevant to your own situation. This idea also applies to how the economy works.

Economic history can seem complicated because it's part of politics, psychology, sociology, criminology, biology, military, technology, education, finance, etc. But within all that complexity is a lot of similarities.

The lens to look through

  • People seem to want the same economic things – security, power, admiration, fulfillment.
  • They tend to use the same tactics to acquire those things - work, risk, incentives, persuasion, theft, control.
  • They tend to fall for the same flaws pursuing those things - overconfidence, pessimism, underestimating how fast things can change, etc.

Although economic history may seem complicated, there are only a small number of broad story plots throughout the world and throughout time.

8 more ideas

About flying dragons and their size

It might seem as taken from the pages of a fairytale, but flying dragons have once existed, scientists claim. They also state that birds descend from these. The size of one of the largest flying an...

A modern flying dragon

Even if way smaller in size, flying dragons can still be seen nowadays. Especially in South Asia, where they are actually pretty common. They are the so-called 'iguanian lizards' and they feed themselves mostly on insects. You do not have to worry, though, as they are really small: the largest one can grow only to a length of maximum 20 centimeters.

The flying dragons without wings

In Asia one can see dragons that, instead of literally flying, glide through air. These are the snakes with legs. They can glide for such long distances that, were they to store lighter-than-air gases, they could actually fly.

one more idea