Back Up Your Point With Evidence

When you’re correcting someone , be prepared to back up your point with real evidence, and not just your well-intended opinion.
Real data that supports your point is the single best way to correct false information.

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Pull the person you want to correct aside for a private, one-on-one conversation instead of highlighting their error in front of a larger group.
Also, to correct them before they get in trouble for their mistake. A little embarrassment right now will save them even greater mortification in the long run.

They will help you to:

  • Gut-check our own correction. Hearing another person's reasoning might get you to realize that you are actually the one who's wrong.
  • It makes you seem more aggressive and the person that did wrong might accept your help to make the necessary corrections.

To be a real team player, offer to help get the things on the right patch.
Lend a hand in repairing a situation will emphasize collaboration over competition and it will make you far more pleasant to work with to boot.

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Offer Help

It’s your chance to demonstrate that you weren’t trying to be insulting. Plus, you’ll be able to ensure that everything is correct the second time around.

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IDEAS

It’s important to be aware of what state of mind you’re in before tackling a hard choice.

Decision fatigue happens when the mental energy required to weigh the tradeoffs of our decision becomes too much for us to handle. 

You may decide to hold off voicing your opinion if you want to gather your army first. People can contribute experience or information to your thinking — all the things that would make the disagreement stronger or more valid. 

Also, delay the conversation if you’re in a meeting or other public space. Discussing the issue in private will make the powerful person feel less threatened.

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