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To Communicate More Effectively, Use The Theory Of Seven

Using the Theory of Seven

... when communicating with a large group of people:

  • Be clear about your priorities and the message you want to convey. And make sure you know your audience.
  • Avoid vague and confusing time frames.
  • Don't look down on people and don't assume others are idiots.
  • Keep things moving at such a nice pace that there is always something interesting and useful happening.
  • Be creative, unpredictable, passionate, supportive, kind and interested.

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To Communicate More Effectively, Use The Theory Of Seven

To Communicate More Effectively, Use The Theory Of Seven

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucekasanoff/2014/06/26/the-theory-of-seven/

forbes.com

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Key Ideas

The theory of seven

When you have to communicate with a large group of people, you should do so as though everyone is seven years old.
But don't talk down to people. Just make sure your speech is clear and simple.

Using the Theory of Seven

... when communicating with a large group of people:

  • Be clear about your priorities and the message you want to convey. And make sure you know your audience.
  • Avoid vague and confusing time frames.
  • Don't look down on people and don't assume others are idiots.
  • Keep things moving at such a nice pace that there is always something interesting and useful happening.
  • Be creative, unpredictable, passionate, supportive, kind and interested.

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