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A time management coach's surprising advice for the overly organized

Perfection Is Not The Goal

Being an organized person requires a lifestyle change, and is not seasonal. You can't go back to not being organized after your work is done.

The goal is not to become perfect but to have a healthy, productive, organized and peaceful life.

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A time management coach's surprising advice for the overly organized

A time management coach's surprising advice for the overly organized

https://www.fastcompany.com/90466063/a-time-management-coachs-surprising-advice-for-the-overly-organized

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Planning vs Doing

If you spend more time planning and organizing than doing, it's time to shift your focus. Don't waste your time searching for "the perfect organizational system".

Instead of focusing on perfection, establish simple habits and easy-to-do routines that get more done. You will get better over time.

Tips To Be Productive

  • Use the way to organize that is most comfortable to you, be it pen and paper or an app.

  • Saying No, and not committing to others as a habit, can be a powerful organizational tool, freeing you up from obligatory work, which clutters up your day and your focus.

Perfection Is Not The Goal

Being an organized person requires a lifestyle change, and is not seasonal. You can't go back to not being organized after your work is done.

The goal is not to become perfect but to have a healthy, productive, organized and peaceful life.

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