Old Fundamentals

There is a tendency to undervalue old ideas and fundamental wisdom, based on an assumption that old ideas will provide an average result.

In reality, old fundamentals are those great and time-tested ideas that have outlasted other bad ideas.

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Self Improvement

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Executing Of Old Ideas
  • While fitness fads come and go, the fundamentals of basic weight lifting or daily walk remain strong.
  • Companies executing fundamental selling practices, like making more calls to increase sales, seem to do better.
  • Old books offering time-tested knowledge are still in print, while newer bestsellers disappear after a short time.

Implementing fundamentals is often the difference between success and failure.

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Our culture claims that work is unavoidable and natural. The idea that the world can be freed from work, wholly or in part, has been suppressed for as long as capitalism has existed.

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Two of the biggest innovations

Two of the biggest innovations of modern times are cars and airplanes. At first, every new invention looks like a toy. It takes decades for people to realise the potential of it.

  • Adolphus Greely, a brigadier general, was one of the first people outside the car industry to consider the usefulness of a "horseless carriage." He bought three cars in 1899 for the U.S. Army to experiment with. It was envisioned to be used as transportation of light artillery such as machine guns, to carry equipment, ammunition, and supplies.
  • The Wright brothers saw the prospects of their new flying machine to be used as a reconnoitering agent in a time of war. The U.S. Army purchased the first "flyer" in 1908.

Human history is often framed as a series of episodes, representing sudden bursts of knowledge. The Agricultural Revolution, the Renaissance, and the Industrial Revolution are a few examples where it is generally thought that innovation moved quicker than at other points in history, leading to a shake-up in science, literature, technology, and philosophy.

The Scientific Revolution is the most notable of these, emerging just after the dark ages.

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