The meaning of the 'Doorway Effect' - Deepstash

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Why does walking through doorways make us forget?

The meaning of the 'Doorway Effect'

We have all experienced, at one point in our life, the so-called 'Doorway Effect': the fact of intending to do something, but immediately after having started, we forget what we were about to do. 

Our attention has the tendency to shift from one thing to another according to our ambitions, plans, strategies. It is at this exact point that the 'Doorway Effect' occurs.

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Why does walking through doorways make us forget?

Why does walking through doorways make us forget?

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20160307-why-does-walking-through-doorways-make-us-forget

bbc.com

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Key Ideas

The meaning of the 'Doorway Effect'

We have all experienced, at one point in our life, the so-called 'Doorway Effect': the fact of intending to do something, but immediately after having started, we forget what we were about to do. 

Our attention has the tendency to shift from one thing to another according to our ambitions, plans, strategies. It is at this exact point that the 'Doorway Effect' occurs.

The cause of the 'Doorway Effect'

The 'Doorway Effect' occurs whenever we change our physical environment, as this results also in changing our mental environment. This is why so often when we enter a room in search of one item, we tend to exit the room with everything but that one item. In just a few minutes, we forget what it was that we were supposed to search and our mind chooses another point of interest.

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