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How a Good Leader Reacts to a Crisis

A leader's response

A leader's response to what is happening is of the greatest importance. 

Therefore, providing guidelines while keeping his or her sense of perspective can turn a leader in the most powerful person involved in that very crisis, even if he or she is not taking action directly.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How a Good Leader Reacts to a Crisis

How a Good Leader Reacts to a Crisis

https://hbr.org/2011/01/how-a-good-leader-reacts-to-a

hbr.org

3

Key Ideas

Actions worth being taken 

In times of crisis, the leader's reaction determines the way things are going to end. 

Actions that vary from delegating responsibilities, in order to reach a better organization to responding in a timely way by guiding your people can turn out essential to your company's well-being.

Leaders in times of crisis

In order to keep the business running. managers' reactions in times of crisis are vital. Learning how to address the situation, to make people aware of what is happening, to control the response to the danger or to adapt to changes as they occur are some appropriate behaviors that can make a world of difference.

People like to know that they can rely on their leaders. And a leader who is actively involved in taking action is better seen than one who does not do much to help improve the situation.

A leader's response

A leader's response to what is happening is of the greatest importance. 

Therefore, providing guidelines while keeping his or her sense of perspective can turn a leader in the most powerful person involved in that very crisis, even if he or she is not taking action directly.

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Leaders speak to the real danger, that of leaving the threat unaddressed and unopposed. Courage means taking action and confronting the challenge directly, giving others the courage to do the same.

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Chaos and uncertainty make us want to shut down and become disengaged.

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Act, Don't React

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Problems fuel great leaders, providing opportunities to learn and grow to the next level. 

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Acknowledging the problem

Great leaders acknowledge there is a problem and demonstrate the severity of the problem and the benefit of the solution to stakeholders, partners, and shareholders. 

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Shortcomings of leaders

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Do a "character traits check"
  • Think of someone you thought was a bad leader and list any of the negative behaviors they displayed.
  • Ask yourself if you share any of those behaviors — score 1 for not likely to 5 for very likely: for instance, someone who kept important information away from employees, a micromanager, a vague communicator, a yeller, someone who didn't keep their word.
  • After you identify your potential areas of improvement, make a plan for how you'll work on them.

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Courage

Boldness is something you can develop. 

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Reacting Vs. Responding

Reacting is when we unconsciously experience an emotional trigger and unconsciously express or relieve that emotion

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EQ Versus IQ

Research indicates that Emotional Quotient EQ is what determines how successful you will be as a leader. Most leaders get hired because of their IQ, but promoted or fired because of their EQ.

The good EQ allows you to manage your emotions. It enables you to understand your feelings, manage them and then take time to make the right decision. 

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The “First 15 Minutes” checklist

The “First 15 Minutes” crisis management checklist:

  • focus on the current matter.
  • become the trusted voice in this crisis. Designate a crisis team.
  • monitor in real-time what the media has to say on the topic.
  • get a deeper understanding of the scope of the issue and the vital decisions to be made.
  • prepare an initial 'holding statement' in order to make your opinion pubic. Make sure the statement goes viral fast.
  • document well before speaking publicly. 
  • show humanity, compassion, and concern for any human toll – and mean it. 

  • follow up on everything that you have engaged yourself to fulfill.
Don'ts for times of crisis

Dealing with a crisis increases the risk of taking bad decisions. When times get harder:

  • don't lie, minimize the situation or make jokes regarding the crisis.
  • don't run away from your responsibilities.
  • don't hurry to issue a denial unless you have all the facts.
  • make positive statements when talking about the matter, rather than negative ones.
  • don’t let your fears of liability trump your humanity.
  • don’t speculate until you fully understand the situation.