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How Anxiety Affects Our Buying Behaviors

Anxiety and panic buying

Feeling anxious can lead to quite harmful behaviors, as one tends to always choose the safe path. 

For instance, when stressed over a certain situation directly related to goods, you might feel the need to buy too many products, a fact which, over time, will result in others not having what to buy or you having bought too much and wasting the very products you bought.

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How Anxiety Affects Our Buying Behaviors

How Anxiety Affects Our Buying Behaviors

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/the-science-behind-behavior/202003/how-anxiety-affects-our-buying-behaviors

psychologytoday.com

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Key Ideas

Anxiety encourages us to shop

Throughout time research has proven that shopping enables individuals to relax and forget about their worries. 

Anxiety is one of the most often met reasons that make people choose shopping over any other activity, as this gives us the impression that we can control a situation we have no real control over.

Anxiety and panic buying

Feeling anxious can lead to quite harmful behaviors, as one tends to always choose the safe path. 

For instance, when stressed over a certain situation directly related to goods, you might feel the need to buy too many products, a fact which, over time, will result in others not having what to buy or you having bought too much and wasting the very products you bought.

Anxiety and the need to buy luxury goods

When faced with difficult periods, like the pandemic we are all dealing with at present, individuals seem to tend to associate luxury goods to a greater safety level. 

Furthermore, research has shown that people believe to be able to distance themselves from danger only by purchasing luxurious and expensive products.

Learn to control your anxiety when buying

We are currently required to handle an unprecedented situation, at least for most of us: we need to make sure we have all the necessary goods in the proper amount, without letting the others starve. 

One way to make this work is by buying on a regular basis, just the amount that we need. We can, as a result, ensure both our own and the others' survival.

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Living through a crisis can be genuinely formative. There are enormous growth and power that can come from it.

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Collectively, we may be reconsidering our priorities, the lasting effects that will also have an economic impact.

Long-term effects

With the new constraints of lockdown, people will be facing isolation, boredom, and a need for small joy. During this time, things will be streamlined or lost. After the adjustment period follows a time of re-evaluation in which we decide which behavioral changes we made during a crisis, we will abandon, and which we will sustain.

  • Many pleasures like eating in restaurants and traveling will be resumed.
  • Luxury goods may experience the biggest consumer fallout.
  • Online entertainment might also take a hit.

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Talking To Children

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