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What day is it today?

The illusion of time

To some degree, time is an illusion. We are bound by its forward passage, but the perceptions we have placed upon time have been invented: we invented the year, the month, the day, the hour, the minute, the second.
The way we understand time is almost entirely dependent on the fact that we evolved on this planet, circling this sun.

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What day is it today?

What day is it today?

https://www.vox.com/culture/2020/3/27/21195908/what-day-is-it-today-coronavirus

vox.com

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Key Ideas

The illusion of time

To some degree, time is an illusion. We are bound by its forward passage, but the perceptions we have placed upon time have been invented: we invented the year, the month, the day, the hour, the minute, the second.
The way we understand time is almost entirely dependent on the fact that we evolved on this planet, circling this sun.

Time and labor

Time, at least as we understand it, is also a byproduct of capitalism.
  • In early human cultures, delineations of time were broad understandings of when the sun came up and went down, when the seasons changed. 
  • As industrialization became the norm, time became a mechanized system that no longer served those who’d invented it. We increasingly served at the beck and call of time, for that is how those who possessed capital could best regulate those who performed the labor.

Losing distinction

There is a numbing effect that appears when our days are exactly the same.
But this is how so many of the less privileged around the world, forced to work jobs involving menial labor, day after day after day, already live.

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The Half-Life of Facts

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Data in medicine become half as relevant in 2-3 years. For exact sciences, 2-4 years.

Half life of facts and compound knowledge

If we want our knowledge to compound, we’ll need to focus on the invariant general principles.

Half-lives show us that if we spend time learning something that changes quickly, we might be wasting our time. 

Back to The Simple Life
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From Buddha to Socrates and contemporaries l...

Simple Was Boring

In many prosperous, capitalist societies where consumerism, big pharma and supermarket culture is rampant, leading a quiet, simple life is considered boring.

Big Brands continue to persuade everyone to aspire for more and most people fall for that. 

Benefits of Simple Living
  • Millennials are showing interest in simple living, in pre-consumerist and pre-industrial ways.
  • It seems like a moral way to live and it makes you into a better person.
  • The struggle of living simple and frugal builds up new skill-sets, a certain independence and better health of the mind and body, by being close to nature.

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“Work, Play, Fit, Push” Framework
“Work, Play, Fit, Push”  Framework

1. Set priorities on Sunday.

2. Map out work (limit to top 3), play, fit (plan for at least 30 minutes each day), and push (do something that scares yo...

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Vitamin D supplementation

Getting vitamin D through supplementation shows zero benefits. A study over a period of 5 years found supplementing with Vitamin D had no impact on cancer, heart disease, or stroke.

A number of researchers now argue that people with high vitamin D levels are healthy not because of the vitamin, but because they get plenty of exposure to the sun. Vitamin D is just a marker of that fact.

Sunlight is good for you

A dermatologist discovered our skin uses sunlight to make nitric oxide, a molecule in the body that dilates blood vessels and lowers blood pressure.

He exposed volunteers to the equivalent of 30 minutes of summer sunlight without sunscreen. The result? The nitric oxide levels in the volunteers went up, and their blood pressure lowered. Because of the connection of high blood pressure to heart disease and strokes, this discovery can prevent millions of deaths globally.

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We search for a source to our suffering and we tend to ...

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Blame is a defense mechanism. What we’re defending ourselves from is our own responsibility for dealing with the unpleasant experience we’ve been given.

The benefit in blame is that it allows us to avoid feeling like we’re failing ourselves, that we lack the strength and maturity to come to terms with the reality of unfairness or bad luck.

The Blame Reflex

We can feel safe in pretending that our distress is not evidence of inadequacy in ourselves, but of one in someone else.

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Our culture of work

Our culture claims that work is unavoidable and natural. The idea that the world can be freed from work, wholly or in part, has been suppressed for as long as capitalism has existed.

Exploring the abolition of work
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  • In 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that advances in technology would lead to an age of leisure where people might work 15 hours a week.
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The work ideology is not natural nor very old.

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  • Once the modern work ethic was established, working patterns started to shift. Between 1800 and 1900, the average working week shrank from 80 hours to 60 hours, and in the 1970s to roughly 40 hours.
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