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Zachary

@zachary_pro

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Efficiency obsessed.

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Jul 21, 2020

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Having routinary days for months on end will eventually make time feel like it's slipping through our fingers.

As Marc Wittman, psychologist and time researcher said, "routine kills our memory for respective intervals". New experiences make indents in our memories thus giving us the perception of lengthened time.

When nothing meaningful happens to us our brains don't have anything for it to record.

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@zachary_pro

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Stashed ideas

Many motivational speakers have mentioned the three to four hour biological limit of creative work that can be accomplished in a day.

Great polymaths and thinkers highlight this short amount of working hours when the creative juices flow.

Manual labour, which is mostly assembly line work, or mindless administrative chores like creating reports can be done for far longer.

Simplify Your Time Management With the 'Rule of 4' | Inc.com

inc.com

Tim Ferriss

“A person’s success in life can usually be measured by the number of uncomfortable conversations he or she is willing to have.” 

Tell Me What You Did Today, And I'll Tell You Who You Are

medium.com

Why we procrastinate

Procrastination is more about our emotions than our tendencies for laziness or just being “bad at deadlines”. At its core, we procrastinate to keep ourselves happy in the moment.

We procrastinate because our brains are wired to care more about our present comfort than our future happiness.

Beyond Time Management: Why We Really Procrastinate and How to Finally Stop - Ambition & Balance

doist.com

Make Dream a Reality

A dream is the root of all success, for having a dream does not limit you on what you can do. Successful people allow themselves to lean back and imagine the kind of life that is possible for them.

The 80 20 Rule Explained (a.k.a. Pareto Principle) | Brian Tracy

briantracy.com

Working with guilt and fear

It's a bad habit to have when it's the end of the workday yet you still feel guilty that maybe you haven't done enough, so you continue working even though it isn't the time to do so anymore.

Keeping up with this practice will only lead our bodies to be exhausted, overworked, and burnt out.

The Guilt of Not Working More, When We're Done for the Day - zen habits

zenhabits.net

Make planning a habit

Some mornings we feel motivated to create a to-do list, but that is often the exception. We need to get things done, even when we feel disengaged.

Start by setting the alarm for your daily planning session at the same time every day. Tack your new daily planning session onto an existing habit like drinking your morning coffee.

How to Plan Your Day: The Complete Guide to Everyday Productivity

doist.com

Procrastination and subjective value

Our choice to work on a project is guided by how much we value finishing that project in that moment. Psychologists call this "subjective value."

Procrastination, psychologically speaking, is what happens when the value of doing something else outweighs the value of working now.

The psychological origins of procrastination – and how we can stop putting things off

theconversation.com

The Planning Fallacy

We all have busy schedules, but we are incorrectly planning our day around the time we have, not around priorities.

Our estimates on how long certain tasks will take are almost always not realistic.

Escape the tyranny of the to-do list: how to schedule your priorities, not your time | The JotForm Blog

jotform.com

Everything that might potentially require action must be reviewed on a frequent enough basis to keep your mind from taking back the job of remembering and reminding.

Elements of the weekly review:

  • Gather and process all your stuff
  • Review your system
  • Update your lists
  • Get clean, clear, current, and complete.
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