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Why Do We Yawn and Is It Contagious?

Why We Yawn

Yawning is not due to lack of oxygen in the brain as previously thought, but due to a temperature regulation activity, according to a 2014 study. This helps explain why we yawn less in the winters.

We yawn when we are tired or bored, as the brain slows down, causing the temperature to drop. We also yawn when the body wants to wake itself up, stretching out the lungs and tissues and pumping blood towards our face and brain.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why Do We Yawn and Is It Contagious?

Why Do We Yawn and Is It Contagious?

https://www.healthline.com/health/why-do-we-yawn

healthline.com

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Key Ideas

Why We Yawn

Yawning is not due to lack of oxygen in the brain as previously thought, but due to a temperature regulation activity, according to a 2014 study. This helps explain why we yawn less in the winters.

We yawn when we are tired or bored, as the brain slows down, causing the temperature to drop. We also yawn when the body wants to wake itself up, stretching out the lungs and tissues and pumping blood towards our face and brain.

Catching A Yawn

Yawning is contagious, and we catch the yawn even while reading(Yawn!) or watching a video of people yawning. A study conducted has shown a link between catching someone’s yawn and empathy, with the more empathetic people yawning more frequently after seeing someone else yawn.

Stop The Yawn

Deep breathing exercises can help us regulate our yawning. It also helps to exercise regularly, avoiding or limiting caffeine and alcohol, and having a sleeping schedule. Drink plenty of water to keep yourself hydrated and cool, along with fruits and veggies.

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