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Helping Others Can Help You Cope with Lockdown

Helping others during a pandemic

Research shows that, whenever we help others, we help ourselves too. This happens because we focus on someone else's needs rather than ours, which enables us to feel less stressed and more connected to the ones around. Therefore, our actions turn out to be beneficial both for the recipients and for the helpers.

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Helping Others Can Help You Cope with Lockdown

Helping Others Can Help You Cope with Lockdown

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/helping_others_can_help_you_cope_with_lockdown

greatergood.berkeley.edu

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Key Ideas

Helping others during a pandemic

Research shows that, whenever we help others, we help ourselves too. This happens because we focus on someone else's needs rather than ours, which enables us to feel less stressed and more connected to the ones around. Therefore, our actions turn out to be beneficial both for the recipients and for the helpers.

Helping others while in quarantine

If you feel like helping others while you are forced to stay in self-isolation, here is some good news for you: this is totally possible. By making donations to hospitals, caring for doctors' children or creating opportunities of any kind for people to gather up virtually, you can not only make the ones around you feel less stressed but also give yourself a chance to rediscover the true meaning of the community and focus on something else but your own worries.

Seize the opportunity to help others

Volunteering has mostly positive effects for both sides. Being willing to take a risk of contracting a virus or just spending your free time helping others instead of focusing on yourself can actually pay off. Furthermore, volunteering can even feel as an easy task, provided that you control how much time you spend focusing on the others. Don't go overboard and everything will be alright.

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