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No, CBD is not a miracle molecule

CBD

CBD

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a drug derived from marijuana and hemp plants. It has been hyped up to cure many ailments, including heart disease, cancer, and even the new virus. These claims have been debunked.

CBD does have its uses as a treatment for seizures in patients with epilepsy. It also reduces anxiety and helps with inflammation of the joints.

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No, CBD is not a miracle molecule

No, CBD is not a miracle molecule

https://theconversation.com/no-cbd-is-not-a-miracle-molecule-that-can-cure-coronavirus-just-as-it-wont-cure-many-other-maladies-its-proponents-claim-132492

theconversation.com

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Key Ideas

CBD

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a drug derived from marijuana and hemp plants. It has been hyped up to cure many ailments, including heart disease, cancer, and even the new virus. These claims have been debunked.

CBD does have its uses as a treatment for seizures in patients with epilepsy. It also reduces anxiety and helps with inflammation of the joints.

Uses and New Studies

CBD is a drug which is bought easily without a prescription. It is used in cupcakes, seltzer, and beer as an ingredient too.

New studies point out that CBD can help with sleep disturbances, psychosis, chronic anxiety, and the Fragile X Syndrome.

Dangers of CBD

  • CBD has shown to induce mild liver damage in about 17 percent of people, according to a large study.

  • Being a seizure medication, CBD can also promote suicidal thoughts. Apart from this, the common side effects of CBD are sleepiness and diarrhea.

Take any claim with a pinch of salt, and make sure the basics of good health (good diet, adequate sleep, regular exercise, and less stress) are followed.

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