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Taoism; Follow the Path of Least Resistance to Overcome Any Obstacle

Taoism: go with the flow

“When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.”
Lao Tzu

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Taoism; Follow the Path of Least Resistance to Overcome Any Obstacle

Taoism; Follow the Path of Least Resistance to Overcome Any Obstacle

https://medium.com/the-philosophers-stone/taoism-follow-the-path-of-least-resistance-to-overcome-any-obstacle-96ce00385c2f

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Key Ideas

Taoism

Living in a fast-moving society like ours might get overwhelming at times: we have to fulfill so many tasks on a daily basis, that we often do this at the expense of our own health. However, there are ways to relax ourselves and learn how to enjoy life again. The philosophy of Taoism is one of these ways.

Taoism and its wisdom

Taoism is based on the idea of flow, which translates into paying more attention to the nature and trying to understand and, if possible, to apply, its way of functioning. According to Taoism, we should not try to swim against the current, but rather let it drive us. In the very end, it seems, we are anyway going to end up where we have always been supposed to.

Living the present moment

Taoism focuses on the idea of flow. According to this, individuals should stop hurrying to achieve something every single moment of their life, but rather take small steps while still enjoying the present.

Taoism: go with the flow

“When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.”
Lao Tzu

Natural wisdom

“Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.” -Lao Tzu

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