deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

STASHES TO GET YOU STARTED

© Brainstash, Inc

deepstash

Beta

Taoism; Follow the Path of Least Resistance to Overcome Any Obstacle

Natural wisdom

“Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.” -Lao Tzu

60 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Taoism; Follow the Path of Least Resistance to Overcome Any Obstacle

Taoism; Follow the Path of Least Resistance to Overcome Any Obstacle

https://medium.com/the-philosophers-stone/taoism-follow-the-path-of-least-resistance-to-overcome-any-obstacle-96ce00385c2f

medium.com

5

Key Ideas

Taoism

Living in a fast-moving society like ours might get overwhelming at times: we have to fulfill so many tasks on a daily basis, that we often do this at the expense of our own health. However, there are ways to relax ourselves and learn how to enjoy life again. The philosophy of Taoism is one of these ways.

Taoism and its wisdom

Taoism is based on the idea of flow, which translates into paying more attention to the nature and trying to understand and, if possible, to apply, its way of functioning. According to Taoism, we should not try to swim against the current, but rather let it drive us. In the very end, it seems, we are anyway going to end up where we have always been supposed to.

Living the present moment

Taoism focuses on the idea of flow. According to this, individuals should stop hurrying to achieve something every single moment of their life, but rather take small steps while still enjoying the present.

Taoism: go with the flow

“When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.”
Lao Tzu

Natural wisdom

“Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.” -Lao Tzu

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Goal setting

Goal setting

Is the act of selecting a target or objective you wish to achieve.

Goal setting is not only about choosing the rewards you want to enjoy, but also the costs you are willing to pay t...

The Rudders and Oars Metaphor

It helps clarify the difference between SYSTEMS and GOALS:
  • Your goals are like the rudder on a small rowboat. They set the direction and determine where you go. 
  • If you commit to one goal, then the rudder stays put and you continue moving forward. 
  • If you flip-flop between goals, then the rudder moves all around and it is easy to find yourself rowing in circles.
  • If the rudder is your goal, then the oars are your process for achieving it. While the rudder determines your direction, it is the oars that determine your progress.

Example: If you’re a writer, your goal is to write a book. Your system is the writing schedule that you follow each week.

How to Set Goals You'll Actually Follow

  1. Ruthlessly Eliminate Your Goals. Consistently prune and trim down your goals. If you can muster the courage to prune away a few of your goals, then you create the space you need for the remaining goals to fully blossom.
  2. Stack Your Goals. Make a specific plan for when, where and how you will perform this."Networking: After I return from my lunch break, I will send one email to someone I want to meet."
  3. Set an Upper Bound. Don't focus on the minimum threshold. Instead of saying,  “I want to make at least 10 sales calls today.” rather say, “I want to make at least 10 sales calls today, but not more than 20.”

2 more ideas

Past and future

Past and future
  • When English speakers use hand gestures to talk about the past and the future, they thrust a hand over the shoulder for the past and put a hand forward to indicate the future. English speake...

How humans sense time

Humans are different from animals in that we don't sense time only as passing. We dice time into units or think of time to go beyond our lifespan, such as millennia. We rely on time concepts that allow us to make plans, follow recipes, and discuss possible futures.

Describing yesterday and tomorrow

Recent research suggests that across all cultures, the concept of time depends on metaphor, known as a conceptual metaphor. We build our understanding of duration and sequences of events out of familiar spatial ideas such as size, movement, and location.

But the "time is like space" metaphor takes on very different forms from one culture to the next.

5 more ideas

The Zen View Of Morals

Evil cannot be destroyed, any more than good can, because they are polar opposites of the same thing. Destruction and creation, chaos and order; opposite aspects of reality, in tension with one ano...

The Zen View Of Life

For Zen practitioners, life is transitory and insubstantial. There is no security and thinking otherwise is a waste of time. 

They also don’t believe in an afterlife. Reincarnation can be more accurately thought of as a constant rebirth, of death throughout life, and the continual coming and going of universal energy before and after death.

The Zen View Of The World

The word 'Zen' means emptiness or void. This is the basis of Zen — that all that exists is based on a dynamic emptiness. Which is also what quantum science says.

In this view, there is no difference between matter and energy. Look at anything closely enough and you will see that it is an event, not a thing. Furthermore, there is not a ‘multiplicity of events’. There is just one event, with multiple aspects, unfolding. 

3 more ideas